Delayed sleep time in African Americans and depression in a community-based population

Omavi Bailey, Daniel Combs, Maria Sans-Fuentes, Cody M. Havens, Michael A. Grandner, Chithra Poongkunran, Sarah Patel, Sarah Berryhill, Natalie Provencio, Stuart F Quan, Sairam Parthasarathy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Study Objectives: Studies have shown racial differences in circadian rhythm in African Americans when compared to non-Hispanic whites, and an association between circadian dyssynchrony and depression. We hypothesized that the prevalence of delayed sleep time is greater in African Americans when compared to whites and that delayed sleep time is associated with depression. Methods: We analyzed data from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS), a large community-based sample. Delayed sleep time was defined as self-reported weeknight bedtime after midnight. Depression was defined based on participant’s response to the question, “In the past 4 weeks have you felt downhearted and blue?” or reported antidepressant use. We performed multivariate linear and logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, apnea-hypopnea index, alcohol use, and caffeine consumption. Results: Adjusted weekday bedtime was 15 ± 7 minutes later in African Americans compared to whites (P < .001). Similarly, weekend bedtime was 18 ± 7 minutes later in African Americans compared to whites (P = .025). The prevalence of delayed sleep time was greater in African Americans (33.3%) compared to whites (18.7%; P < .001). After adjusting for confounders, when compared to whites, a greater proportion of African Americans had delayed sleep time (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.03; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.5, 2.4; P < .0001). Depression was independently associated with delayed sleep time after adjustment (aOR 1.4; 95% CI 1.1, 1.7; P = .007). Conclusions: African Americans are more likely to have a delayed sleep time compared to whites, and delayed sleep time was independently associated with depression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-864
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Sleep Medicine
Volume15
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

African Americans
Sleep
Depression
Population
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Social Adjustment
Apnea
Circadian Rhythm
Caffeine
Antidepressive Agents
Linear Models
Body Mass Index
Logistic Models
Smoking
Alcohols
Health

Keywords

  • African American
  • Delayed sleep phase
  • Depression
  • Health disparities

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Delayed sleep time in African Americans and depression in a community-based population. / Bailey, Omavi; Combs, Daniel; Sans-Fuentes, Maria; Havens, Cody M.; Grandner, Michael A.; Poongkunran, Chithra; Patel, Sarah; Berryhill, Sarah; Provencio, Natalie; Quan, Stuart F; Parthasarathy, Sairam.

In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 6, 01.01.2019, p. 857-864.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bailey, O, Combs, D, Sans-Fuentes, M, Havens, CM, Grandner, MA, Poongkunran, C, Patel, S, Berryhill, S, Provencio, N, Quan, SF & Parthasarathy, S 2019, 'Delayed sleep time in African Americans and depression in a community-based population', Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine, vol. 15, no. 6, pp. 857-864. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.7836
Bailey O, Combs D, Sans-Fuentes M, Havens CM, Grandner MA, Poongkunran C et al. Delayed sleep time in African Americans and depression in a community-based population. Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2019 Jan 1;15(6):857-864. https://doi.org/10.5664/jcsm.7836
Bailey, Omavi ; Combs, Daniel ; Sans-Fuentes, Maria ; Havens, Cody M. ; Grandner, Michael A. ; Poongkunran, Chithra ; Patel, Sarah ; Berryhill, Sarah ; Provencio, Natalie ; Quan, Stuart F ; Parthasarathy, Sairam. / Delayed sleep time in African Americans and depression in a community-based population. In: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine. 2019 ; Vol. 15, No. 6. pp. 857-864.
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abstract = "Study Objectives: Studies have shown racial differences in circadian rhythm in African Americans when compared to non-Hispanic whites, and an association between circadian dyssynchrony and depression. We hypothesized that the prevalence of delayed sleep time is greater in African Americans when compared to whites and that delayed sleep time is associated with depression. Methods: We analyzed data from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS), a large community-based sample. Delayed sleep time was defined as self-reported weeknight bedtime after midnight. Depression was defined based on participant’s response to the question, “In the past 4 weeks have you felt downhearted and blue?” or reported antidepressant use. We performed multivariate linear and logistic regression, adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index, smoking, apnea-hypopnea index, alcohol use, and caffeine consumption. Results: Adjusted weekday bedtime was 15 ± 7 minutes later in African Americans compared to whites (P < .001). Similarly, weekend bedtime was 18 ± 7 minutes later in African Americans compared to whites (P = .025). The prevalence of delayed sleep time was greater in African Americans (33.3{\%}) compared to whites (18.7{\%}; P < .001). After adjusting for confounders, when compared to whites, a greater proportion of African Americans had delayed sleep time (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.03; 95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI] 1.5, 2.4; P < .0001). Depression was independently associated with delayed sleep time after adjustment (aOR 1.4; 95{\%} CI 1.1, 1.7; P = .007). Conclusions: African Americans are more likely to have a delayed sleep time compared to whites, and delayed sleep time was independently associated with depression.",
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