Delicious poison: genetics of Drosophila host plant preference

Noah K. Whiteman, Naomi E. Pierce

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 23 Citations

Abstract

Insects use chemical cues to identify host plants, which suggests that chemosensory perception could be a target of natural selection during host specialization. Five papers using data from the 12 recently sequenced Drosophila genomes examined chemosensory gene function and evolution across specialist and generalist species. A functional study identifies odorant binding proteins that mediate loss of toxin avoidance in a specialist, and targeted genomic studies indicate specialists and island endemics lose chemosensory genes more rapidly than generalist and mainland relatives. Together, these studies suggest a mode of chemoreceptor evolution dominated by birth/death dynamics, coupled with a low level of potential positive selection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)473-478
Number of pages6
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume23
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Drosophila
host plants
genes
generalist
host plant
gene
protein depletion
chemoreceptors
odor compounds
natural selection
binding proteins
toxins
death
genomics
insects
genome
chemical cue
toxin
insect
protein

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Delicious poison : genetics of Drosophila host plant preference. / Whiteman, Noah K.; Pierce, Naomi E.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 23, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 473-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Whiteman, Noah K.; Pierce, Naomi E. / Delicious poison : genetics of Drosophila host plant preference.

In: Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol. 23, No. 9, 09.2008, p. 473-478.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{28af7e880c3e4fc784962b34001fae99,
title = "Delicious poison: genetics of Drosophila host plant preference",
abstract = "Insects use chemical cues to identify host plants, which suggests that chemosensory perception could be a target of natural selection during host specialization. Five papers using data from the 12 recently sequenced Drosophila genomes examined chemosensory gene function and evolution across specialist and generalist species. A functional study identifies odorant binding proteins that mediate loss of toxin avoidance in a specialist, and targeted genomic studies indicate specialists and island endemics lose chemosensory genes more rapidly than generalist and mainland relatives. Together, these studies suggest a mode of chemoreceptor evolution dominated by birth/death dynamics, coupled with a low level of potential positive selection.",
author = "Whiteman, {Noah K.} and Pierce, {Naomi E.}",
year = "2008",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.tree.2008.05.010",
volume = "23",
pages = "473--478",
journal = "Trends in Ecology and Evolution",
issn = "0169-5347",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Delicious poison

T2 - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

AU - Whiteman,Noah K.

AU - Pierce,Naomi E.

PY - 2008/9

Y1 - 2008/9

N2 - Insects use chemical cues to identify host plants, which suggests that chemosensory perception could be a target of natural selection during host specialization. Five papers using data from the 12 recently sequenced Drosophila genomes examined chemosensory gene function and evolution across specialist and generalist species. A functional study identifies odorant binding proteins that mediate loss of toxin avoidance in a specialist, and targeted genomic studies indicate specialists and island endemics lose chemosensory genes more rapidly than generalist and mainland relatives. Together, these studies suggest a mode of chemoreceptor evolution dominated by birth/death dynamics, coupled with a low level of potential positive selection.

AB - Insects use chemical cues to identify host plants, which suggests that chemosensory perception could be a target of natural selection during host specialization. Five papers using data from the 12 recently sequenced Drosophila genomes examined chemosensory gene function and evolution across specialist and generalist species. A functional study identifies odorant binding proteins that mediate loss of toxin avoidance in a specialist, and targeted genomic studies indicate specialists and island endemics lose chemosensory genes more rapidly than generalist and mainland relatives. Together, these studies suggest a mode of chemoreceptor evolution dominated by birth/death dynamics, coupled with a low level of potential positive selection.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=49049120078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=49049120078&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.tree.2008.05.010

DO - 10.1016/j.tree.2008.05.010

M3 - Article

VL - 23

SP - 473

EP - 478

JO - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

JF - Trends in Ecology and Evolution

SN - 0169-5347

IS - 9

ER -