DEPLOYMENT OF THE MX SPECTROMETER.

J. M. Hill, Michael P Lesser

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The MX Spectrometer is a remotely controlled multiple object fiber optic spectrometer head. Mobile fiber probes provide the capacity to obtain simultaneous spectra of many objects. Our experience with the Medusa aperture plate fiber optic spectrograph led us to design and build the MX with automated fiber positioning in the telescope focal plane. 32 stepper motor driven probes in a fisherman-around-the-pond arrangement position 64 fibers in the 45 arcminute field of the Steward Observatory 2. 3m telescope. An onboard Z-80 microprocessor interfaces to 64 intelligent stepper motor controllers. The intelligent controllers allow simultaneous motion of all the probes for rapid field alignment. All fibers can be moved from one target pattern to another in less than 90 seconds. Two arcsecond diameter fiber apertures can be moved in steps as small as 0. 1 arcseconds (10 microns). Probe collisions are prevented by software which maps the footprint of each probe in the focal plane.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
EditorsDavid L. Crawford
PublisherSPIE
Pages303-320
Number of pages18
Volume627
Editionpt 1
ISBN (Print)0892526629
StatePublished - 1986

Fingerprint

Spectrometers
spectrometers
fibers
Fibers
probes
Telescopes
Fiber optics
fiber optics
controllers
apertures
telescopes
Controllers
Spectrographs
microprocessors
Ponds
Observatories
footprints
positioning
spectrographs
Microprocessor chips

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Hill, J. M., & Lesser, M. P. (1986). DEPLOYMENT OF THE MX SPECTROMETER. In D. L. Crawford (Ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering (pt 1 ed., Vol. 627, pp. 303-320). SPIE.

DEPLOYMENT OF THE MX SPECTROMETER. / Hill, J. M.; Lesser, Michael P.

Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. ed. / David L. Crawford. Vol. 627 pt 1. ed. SPIE, 1986. p. 303-320.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hill, JM & Lesser, MP 1986, DEPLOYMENT OF THE MX SPECTROMETER. in DL Crawford (ed.), Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. pt 1 edn, vol. 627, SPIE, pp. 303-320.
Hill JM, Lesser MP. DEPLOYMENT OF THE MX SPECTROMETER. In Crawford DL, editor, Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. pt 1 ed. Vol. 627. SPIE. 1986. p. 303-320
Hill, J. M. ; Lesser, Michael P. / DEPLOYMENT OF THE MX SPECTROMETER. Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. editor / David L. Crawford. Vol. 627 pt 1. ed. SPIE, 1986. pp. 303-320
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