Deposition patterns of ragweed pollen in the human respiratory tract

T. B. Martonen, Mary Kay O'Rourke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Inhaled particle deposition sites must be identified to effectively treat human airway diseases. We have determined distribution patterns of a selected aeroallergen, ragweed pollen, among human extrathoracic (ET i e., oro-nasopharyngeal) regions and the lung. A predictive model validated by inhalation exposure data from human subjects was utilized. Deposition locations were .primarily functions of 1. ragweed particle parameters (size: 14-20 µm, shape: spherical, and density: 1.14 g cm-3) and 2. mode of breathing. In the general population, two styles of inhalation are prevalent: normal augmentors (NAs), and mouth breathers (MBs), their clinical definitions are based on intra-ET airflow divisions. For a NA-mode breathing, sedentary (10 L m-1) adult, 88% of inhaled ragweed pollen was removed by the ET compartment and 7% collected within the lung. For a MB. the respective deposition efficiencies were 68% and 25%. To apply the model, we used a daily springtime ragweed pollen concentration of 300 grains m-3 and an exposure time of 0.5 hour to calculate actual doses for the respiratory system. Under the stipulated conditions, a MB would inhale 45 pollen grains per day and 8 would be deposited in the lung; the value is 3 grains for a NA. Frequently, individuals with impaired respiratory functions are MBs in whom such pollen deposits are likely contributors to ainway disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberA018
Pages (from-to)82-86
Number of pages5
JournalGrana
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1991

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respiratory system
pollen
mouth
breathing
lungs
inhalation exposure
lung function
air flow
human diseases
airflow
exposure duration
respiratory tract
dosage
exposure
particle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Deposition patterns of ragweed pollen in the human respiratory tract. / Martonen, T. B.; O'Rourke, Mary Kay.

In: Grana, Vol. 30, No. 1, A018, 1991, p. 82-86.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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