Depression Screening Patterns, Predictors, and Trends Among Adults Without a Depression Diagnosis in Ambulatory Settings in the United States

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6 Scopus citations

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study examined national patterns, predictors, and trends in depression screening among adults without a diagnosis of depression in the United States. METHODS: A cross-sectional design utilizing pooled data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2005-2015) was used. The study sample consisted of ambulatory care visits to nonpsychiatrists among adults (≥18 years) without a depression diagnosis. Depression screening was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and piecewise regression analyses were conducted to achieve the study objectives. RESULTS: The national-level depression screening rate was 1.4% of all adult ambulatory care visits. Year, gender, physician specialty, geographic region, and time spent with physician were significantly associated with depression screening. Piecewise regression analysis revealed a statistically significant (p<.001) interaction between year and change in depression screening rate, where screening rates increased significantly after 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Although screening rates have increased significantly after 2009, screening remains low among adults without a depression diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1098-1100
Number of pages3
JournalPsychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
Volume69
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Ambulatory setting
  • Depression screening
  • Trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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