Depression Screening Patterns, Predictors, and Trends Among Adults Without a Depression Diagnosis in Ambulatory Settings in the United States

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: This study examined national patterns, predictors, and trends in depression screening among adults without a diagnosis of depression in the United States. METHODS: A cross-sectional design utilizing pooled data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2005-2015) was used. The study sample consisted of ambulatory care visits to nonpsychiatrists among adults (≥18 years) without a depression diagnosis. Depression screening was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and piecewise regression analyses were conducted to achieve the study objectives. RESULTS: The national-level depression screening rate was 1.4% of all adult ambulatory care visits. Year, gender, physician specialty, geographic region, and time spent with physician were significantly associated with depression screening. Piecewise regression analysis revealed a statistically significant (p<.001) interaction between year and change in depression screening rate, where screening rates increased significantly after 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Although screening rates have increased significantly after 2009, screening remains low among adults without a depression diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1098-1100
Number of pages3
JournalPsychiatric services (Washington, D.C.)
Volume69
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2018

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Ambulatory Care
Regression Analysis
Health Care Surveys
Physicians
Logistic Models

Keywords

  • Adults
  • Ambulatory setting
  • Depression screening
  • Trends

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Depression Screening Patterns, Predictors, and Trends Among Adults Without a Depression Diagnosis in Ambulatory Settings in the United States",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: This study examined national patterns, predictors, and trends in depression screening among adults without a diagnosis of depression in the United States. METHODS: A cross-sectional design utilizing pooled data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2005-2015) was used. The study sample consisted of ambulatory care visits to nonpsychiatrists among adults (≥18 years) without a depression diagnosis. Depression screening was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and piecewise regression analyses were conducted to achieve the study objectives. RESULTS: The national-level depression screening rate was 1.4{\%} of all adult ambulatory care visits. Year, gender, physician specialty, geographic region, and time spent with physician were significantly associated with depression screening. Piecewise regression analysis revealed a statistically significant (p<.001) interaction between year and change in depression screening rate, where screening rates increased significantly after 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Although screening rates have increased significantly after 2009, screening remains low among adults without a depression diagnosis.",
keywords = "Adults, Ambulatory setting, Depression screening, Trends",
author = "Sandipan Bhattacharjee and Goldstone, {Lisa Whittington} and Nina Vadiei and Lee, {Jeannie K} and Burke, {William J.}",
year = "2018",
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doi = "10.1176/appi.ps.201700439",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "69",
pages = "1098--1100",
journal = "Psychiatric Services",
issn = "1075-2730",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Association",
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TY - JOUR

T1 - Depression Screening Patterns, Predictors, and Trends Among Adults Without a Depression Diagnosis in Ambulatory Settings in the United States

AU - Bhattacharjee, Sandipan

AU - Goldstone, Lisa Whittington

AU - Vadiei, Nina

AU - Lee, Jeannie K

AU - Burke, William J.

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE: This study examined national patterns, predictors, and trends in depression screening among adults without a diagnosis of depression in the United States. METHODS: A cross-sectional design utilizing pooled data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2005-2015) was used. The study sample consisted of ambulatory care visits to nonpsychiatrists among adults (≥18 years) without a depression diagnosis. Depression screening was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and piecewise regression analyses were conducted to achieve the study objectives. RESULTS: The national-level depression screening rate was 1.4% of all adult ambulatory care visits. Year, gender, physician specialty, geographic region, and time spent with physician were significantly associated with depression screening. Piecewise regression analysis revealed a statistically significant (p<.001) interaction between year and change in depression screening rate, where screening rates increased significantly after 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Although screening rates have increased significantly after 2009, screening remains low among adults without a depression diagnosis.

AB - OBJECTIVE: This study examined national patterns, predictors, and trends in depression screening among adults without a diagnosis of depression in the United States. METHODS: A cross-sectional design utilizing pooled data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (2005-2015) was used. The study sample consisted of ambulatory care visits to nonpsychiatrists among adults (≥18 years) without a depression diagnosis. Depression screening was the dependent variable. Descriptive statistics, logistic regression, and piecewise regression analyses were conducted to achieve the study objectives. RESULTS: The national-level depression screening rate was 1.4% of all adult ambulatory care visits. Year, gender, physician specialty, geographic region, and time spent with physician were significantly associated with depression screening. Piecewise regression analysis revealed a statistically significant (p<.001) interaction between year and change in depression screening rate, where screening rates increased significantly after 2009. CONCLUSIONS: Although screening rates have increased significantly after 2009, screening remains low among adults without a depression diagnosis.

KW - Adults

KW - Ambulatory setting

KW - Depression screening

KW - Trends

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