Derangements in blood glucose following initial resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest: A report from the national registry of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

David G. Beiser, Gordon E Carr, Dana P. Edelson, Mary Ann Peberdy, Terry L Vanden Hoek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Study aims: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor outcomes in critically ill patients. We examined blood glucose values following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) to (1) characterize post-arrest glucose ranges, (2) develop outcomes-based thresholds of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, and (3) identify risk factors associated with post-arrest glucose derangements. Methods: We retrospectively studied 17,800 adult IHCA events reported to the National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) from January 1, 2005 through February 1, 2007. Results: Data were available from 3218 index events. Maximum blood glucose values were elevated in diabetics (median 226 mg/dL [IQR, 165-307 mg/dL], 12.5 mmol/L [IQR 9.2-17.0 mmol/L]) and non-diabetics (median 176 mg/dL [IQR, 135-239 mg/dL], 9.78 mmol/L [IQR 7.5-13.3 mmol/L]). Unadjusted survival to hospital discharge was higher in non-diabetics than diabetics (45.5% [95% CI, 43.3-47.6%] vs. 41.7% [95% CI, 38.9-44.5%], p = 0.037). Non-diabetics displayed decreased adjusted survival odds for minimum glucose values outside the range of 71-170 mg/dL (3.9-9.4 mmol/L) and maximum values outside the range of 111-240 mg/dL (6.2-13.3 mmol/L). Diabetic survival odds decreased for minimum glucose greater than 240 mg/dL (13.3 mmol/L). In non-diabetics, arrest duration was identified as a significant factor associated with the development of hypo- and hyperglycemia. Conclusions: Hyperglycemia is common in diabetics and non-diabetics following IHCA. Survival odds in diabetics are relatively insensitive to blood glucose with decreased survival only associated with severe (>240 mg/dL, >13.3 mmol/dL) hyperglycemia. In non-diabetics, survival odds were sensitive to hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dL, <3.9 mmol/L).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)624-630
Number of pages7
JournalResuscitation
Volume80
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Heart Arrest
Resuscitation
Hyperglycemia
Registries
Blood Glucose
Hypoglycemia
Glucose
Survival
Critical Illness

Keywords

  • Cardiac arrest
  • Cardiopulmonary resuscitation
  • Heart arrest
  • Hyperglycemia
  • Hypoglycemia
  • Sudden cardiac death

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Emergency
  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Derangements in blood glucose following initial resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest : A report from the national registry of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. / Beiser, David G.; Carr, Gordon E; Edelson, Dana P.; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Hoek, Terry L Vanden.

In: Resuscitation, Vol. 80, No. 6, 06.2009, p. 624-630.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Study aims: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor outcomes in critically ill patients. We examined blood glucose values following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) to (1) characterize post-arrest glucose ranges, (2) develop outcomes-based thresholds of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, and (3) identify risk factors associated with post-arrest glucose derangements. Methods: We retrospectively studied 17,800 adult IHCA events reported to the National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) from January 1, 2005 through February 1, 2007. Results: Data were available from 3218 index events. Maximum blood glucose values were elevated in diabetics (median 226 mg/dL [IQR, 165-307 mg/dL], 12.5 mmol/L [IQR 9.2-17.0 mmol/L]) and non-diabetics (median 176 mg/dL [IQR, 135-239 mg/dL], 9.78 mmol/L [IQR 7.5-13.3 mmol/L]). Unadjusted survival to hospital discharge was higher in non-diabetics than diabetics (45.5{\%} [95{\%} CI, 43.3-47.6{\%}] vs. 41.7{\%} [95{\%} CI, 38.9-44.5{\%}], p = 0.037). Non-diabetics displayed decreased adjusted survival odds for minimum glucose values outside the range of 71-170 mg/dL (3.9-9.4 mmol/L) and maximum values outside the range of 111-240 mg/dL (6.2-13.3 mmol/L). Diabetic survival odds decreased for minimum glucose greater than 240 mg/dL (13.3 mmol/L). In non-diabetics, arrest duration was identified as a significant factor associated with the development of hypo- and hyperglycemia. Conclusions: Hyperglycemia is common in diabetics and non-diabetics following IHCA. Survival odds in diabetics are relatively insensitive to blood glucose with decreased survival only associated with severe (>240 mg/dL, >13.3 mmol/dL) hyperglycemia. In non-diabetics, survival odds were sensitive to hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dL, <3.9 mmol/L).",
keywords = "Cardiac arrest, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, Heart arrest, Hyperglycemia, Hypoglycemia, Sudden cardiac death",
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T1 - Derangements in blood glucose following initial resuscitation from in-hospital cardiac arrest

T2 - A report from the national registry of cardiopulmonary resuscitation

AU - Beiser, David G.

AU - Carr, Gordon E

AU - Edelson, Dana P.

AU - Peberdy, Mary Ann

AU - Hoek, Terry L Vanden

PY - 2009/6

Y1 - 2009/6

N2 - Study aims: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor outcomes in critically ill patients. We examined blood glucose values following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) to (1) characterize post-arrest glucose ranges, (2) develop outcomes-based thresholds of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, and (3) identify risk factors associated with post-arrest glucose derangements. Methods: We retrospectively studied 17,800 adult IHCA events reported to the National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) from January 1, 2005 through February 1, 2007. Results: Data were available from 3218 index events. Maximum blood glucose values were elevated in diabetics (median 226 mg/dL [IQR, 165-307 mg/dL], 12.5 mmol/L [IQR 9.2-17.0 mmol/L]) and non-diabetics (median 176 mg/dL [IQR, 135-239 mg/dL], 9.78 mmol/L [IQR 7.5-13.3 mmol/L]). Unadjusted survival to hospital discharge was higher in non-diabetics than diabetics (45.5% [95% CI, 43.3-47.6%] vs. 41.7% [95% CI, 38.9-44.5%], p = 0.037). Non-diabetics displayed decreased adjusted survival odds for minimum glucose values outside the range of 71-170 mg/dL (3.9-9.4 mmol/L) and maximum values outside the range of 111-240 mg/dL (6.2-13.3 mmol/L). Diabetic survival odds decreased for minimum glucose greater than 240 mg/dL (13.3 mmol/L). In non-diabetics, arrest duration was identified as a significant factor associated with the development of hypo- and hyperglycemia. Conclusions: Hyperglycemia is common in diabetics and non-diabetics following IHCA. Survival odds in diabetics are relatively insensitive to blood glucose with decreased survival only associated with severe (>240 mg/dL, >13.3 mmol/dL) hyperglycemia. In non-diabetics, survival odds were sensitive to hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dL, <3.9 mmol/L).

AB - Study aims: Hyperglycemia is associated with poor outcomes in critically ill patients. We examined blood glucose values following in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) to (1) characterize post-arrest glucose ranges, (2) develop outcomes-based thresholds of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, and (3) identify risk factors associated with post-arrest glucose derangements. Methods: We retrospectively studied 17,800 adult IHCA events reported to the National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (NRCPR) from January 1, 2005 through February 1, 2007. Results: Data were available from 3218 index events. Maximum blood glucose values were elevated in diabetics (median 226 mg/dL [IQR, 165-307 mg/dL], 12.5 mmol/L [IQR 9.2-17.0 mmol/L]) and non-diabetics (median 176 mg/dL [IQR, 135-239 mg/dL], 9.78 mmol/L [IQR 7.5-13.3 mmol/L]). Unadjusted survival to hospital discharge was higher in non-diabetics than diabetics (45.5% [95% CI, 43.3-47.6%] vs. 41.7% [95% CI, 38.9-44.5%], p = 0.037). Non-diabetics displayed decreased adjusted survival odds for minimum glucose values outside the range of 71-170 mg/dL (3.9-9.4 mmol/L) and maximum values outside the range of 111-240 mg/dL (6.2-13.3 mmol/L). Diabetic survival odds decreased for minimum glucose greater than 240 mg/dL (13.3 mmol/L). In non-diabetics, arrest duration was identified as a significant factor associated with the development of hypo- and hyperglycemia. Conclusions: Hyperglycemia is common in diabetics and non-diabetics following IHCA. Survival odds in diabetics are relatively insensitive to blood glucose with decreased survival only associated with severe (>240 mg/dL, >13.3 mmol/dL) hyperglycemia. In non-diabetics, survival odds were sensitive to hypoglycemia (<70 mg/dL, <3.9 mmol/L).

KW - Cardiac arrest

KW - Cardiopulmonary resuscitation

KW - Heart arrest

KW - Hyperglycemia

KW - Hypoglycemia

KW - Sudden cardiac death

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