Design of a long term hydraulic fracture and flow system

EGS Collab Team

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A series of fracture and flow tests are being performed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) as part of the EGS Collab project. The tests involve generating a communicating fracture(s) between two boreholes, and monitoring flow through the generated fracture(s). To perform these tests a robust, remotely operable pressure system is required, as much of the flow testing will be performed over long periods of time when the equipment is not monitored. The system utilizes several pumping systems to include air driven liquid pumps, syringe pumps, and a triplex pump. The syringe pumps and triplex pump are connected to a data acquisition and control system, and can be controlled remotely for pressure and flow. The triplex pump is controlled using a variable frequency drive and a pneumatically actuated back pressure control valve on an integrated flow bypass line. A secondary back pressure control valve can be used to generate back pressure in the production side of the system. The injection and production test intervals are connected at the surface via high-pressure tubing and a differential pressure gauge, and downstream of the production well a series of sensors are in place for detecting tracers injected into the system. The pressurization system is connected to the in situ fracture through a pair (one in each of the boreholes) of straddle packers with a proprietary measurement tool in the packer interval. The tool, dubbed the SIMFIP (Step-Rate Injection Measurement for Fracture In Situ Properties) packs off and allows flow into and out of the interval along with collecting data from numerous sensors. Data from the shakedown of the system, performed at Sandia National Laboratories prior to field deployment, will be presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Event52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium - Seattle, United States
Duration: Jun 17 2018Jun 20 2018

Other

Other52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium
CountryUnited States
CitySeattle
Period6/17/186/20/18

Fingerprint

hydraulics
pump
Hydraulics
Pumps
pumps
control valves
syringes
Syringes
Packers
Pressure control
boreholes
Boreholes
intervals
borehole
injection
sensor
pressure gages
Pressure gages
research facilities
communicating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology

Cite this

EGS Collab Team (2018). Design of a long term hydraulic fracture and flow system. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.

Design of a long term hydraulic fracture and flow system. / EGS Collab Team.

2018. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

EGS Collab Team 2018, 'Design of a long term hydraulic fracture and flow system' Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States, 6/17/18 - 6/20/18, .
EGS Collab Team. Design of a long term hydraulic fracture and flow system. 2018. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.
EGS Collab Team. / Design of a long term hydraulic fracture and flow system. Paper presented at 52nd U.S. Rock Mechanics/Geomechanics Symposium, Seattle, United States.
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abstract = "A series of fracture and flow tests are being performed at the Sanford Underground Research Facility (SURF) as part of the EGS Collab project. The tests involve generating a communicating fracture(s) between two boreholes, and monitoring flow through the generated fracture(s). To perform these tests a robust, remotely operable pressure system is required, as much of the flow testing will be performed over long periods of time when the equipment is not monitored. The system utilizes several pumping systems to include air driven liquid pumps, syringe pumps, and a triplex pump. The syringe pumps and triplex pump are connected to a data acquisition and control system, and can be controlled remotely for pressure and flow. The triplex pump is controlled using a variable frequency drive and a pneumatically actuated back pressure control valve on an integrated flow bypass line. A secondary back pressure control valve can be used to generate back pressure in the production side of the system. The injection and production test intervals are connected at the surface via high-pressure tubing and a differential pressure gauge, and downstream of the production well a series of sensors are in place for detecting tracers injected into the system. The pressurization system is connected to the in situ fracture through a pair (one in each of the boreholes) of straddle packers with a proprietary measurement tool in the packer interval. The tool, dubbed the SIMFIP (Step-Rate Injection Measurement for Fracture In Situ Properties) packs off and allows flow into and out of the interval along with collecting data from numerous sensors. Data from the shakedown of the system, performed at Sandia National Laboratories prior to field deployment, will be presented.",
author = "{EGS Collab Team} and Ingraham, {M. D.} and King, {D. K.} and Knox, {H. A.} and Strickland, {C. E.} and Vermeul, {V. R.} and Y. Guglielmi and P. Cook and T. Doe and J. Ajo-Franklin and Bauer, {S. J.} and T. Baumgartner and K. Beckers and D. Blankenship and A. Bonneville and L. Boyd and Brown, {S. T.} and Burghardt, {J. A.} and T. Chen and Y. Chen and K. Condon and Dobson, {P. F.} and Doughty, {C. A.} and D. Elsworth and J. Feldman and A. Foris and Frash, {L. P.} and Z. Frone and P. Fu and K. Gao and A. Ghassemi and H. Gudmundsdottir and G. Guthrie and B. Haimson and A. Hawkins and J. Heise and Herrick, {C. G.} and M. Horn and Horne, {R. N.} and J. Horner and M. Hu and H. Huang and L. Huang and K. Im and Johnson, {T. C.} and B. Johnston and S. Karra and Kwangmin Kim and T. Kneafsey and J. Knox and D. Kumar",
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AU - EGS Collab Team

AU - Ingraham, M. D.

AU - King, D. K.

AU - Knox, H. A.

AU - Strickland, C. E.

AU - Vermeul, V. R.

AU - Guglielmi, Y.

AU - Cook, P.

AU - Doe, T.

AU - Ajo-Franklin, J.

AU - Bauer, S. J.

AU - Baumgartner, T.

AU - Beckers, K.

AU - Blankenship, D.

AU - Bonneville, A.

AU - Boyd, L.

AU - Brown, S. T.

AU - Burghardt, J. A.

AU - Chen, T.

AU - Chen, Y.

AU - Condon, K.

AU - Dobson, P. F.

AU - Doughty, C. A.

AU - Elsworth, D.

AU - Feldman, J.

AU - Foris, A.

AU - Frash, L. P.

AU - Frone, Z.

AU - Fu, P.

AU - Gao, K.

AU - Ghassemi, A.

AU - Gudmundsdottir, H.

AU - Guthrie, G.

AU - Haimson, B.

AU - Hawkins, A.

AU - Heise, J.

AU - Herrick, C. G.

AU - Horn, M.

AU - Horne, R. N.

AU - Horner, J.

AU - Hu, M.

AU - Huang, H.

AU - Huang, L.

AU - Im, K.

AU - Johnson, T. C.

AU - Johnston, B.

AU - Karra, S.

AU - Kim, Kwangmin

AU - Kneafsey, T.

AU - Knox, J.

AU - Kumar, D.

PY - 2018/1/1

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