Designing inclusive HPV cancer vaccines and increasing uptake among native americans—A cultural perspective review

Skyler J. Bordeaux, Anthony W. Baca, Rene L. Begay, Francine C. Gachupin, J. Gregory Caporaso, Melissa M. Herbst-Kralovetz, Naomi R. Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Despite a global and nationwide decrease, Native Americans continue to experience high rates of cancer morbidity and mortality. Vaccination is one approach to decrease cancer incidence such as the case of cervical cancer. However, the availability of vaccines does not guarantee uptake, as evident in the Coronavirus 2019 pandemic. Therefore, as we consider current and future cancer vaccines, there are certain considerations to be mindful of to increase uptake among Native Americans such as the incidence of disease, social determinants of health, vaccine hesitancy, and historical exclusion in clinical trials. This paper primarily focuses on human papillomavirus (HPV) and potential vaccines for Native Americans. However, we also aim to inform researchers on factors that influence Native American choices surrounding vaccination and interventions including cancer therapies. We begin by providing an overview of the historical distrust and trauma Native Americans experience, both past and present. In addition, we offer guidance and considerations when engaging with sovereign Tribal Nations in vaccine development and clinical trials in order to increase trust and encourage vaccine uptake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3705-3716
Number of pages12
JournalCurrent Oncology
Volume28
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2021

Keywords

  • Bioethics
  • Cervical cancer
  • Clinical trials
  • HPV
  • Native American
  • Vaccines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

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