Detecting the effects of deceptive presidential advertisements in the spring of 2004

Kenneth Winneg, Kate M Kenski, Kathleen Hall Jamieson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Long before the political conventions of 2004, the Kerry and Bush campaigns and their surrogates were laying the groundwork for the fall campaign with heavy ad buys. Some of the assertions made on each side were misleading. Here we explore three misleading claims made on each side in the weeks following the effective end of the 2004 primary season and ask, Did they work? If so, with whom? Results from the National Annenberg Election Survey show that some of these misleading claims about George W. Bush and John Kerry were believed by a majority of citizens. Democrats were more likely to believe deceptive claims about Bush, whereas Republicans were more likely to embrace deceptive claims about Kerry. The claim that "George W. Bush favors sending American jobs overseas" gained traction in battleground states, even when demographic variables and party identification were taken into consideration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-129
Number of pages16
JournalAmerican Behavioral Scientist
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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Traction
political convention
campaign
Demography
overseas
election
citizen
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Deception
  • General election
  • Party identification
  • Political advertising
  • Presidential ads

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Detecting the effects of deceptive presidential advertisements in the spring of 2004. / Winneg, Kenneth; Kenski, Kate M; Jamieson, Kathleen Hall.

In: American Behavioral Scientist, Vol. 49, No. 1, 09.2005, p. 114-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Winneg, Kenneth ; Kenski, Kate M ; Jamieson, Kathleen Hall. / Detecting the effects of deceptive presidential advertisements in the spring of 2004. In: American Behavioral Scientist. 2005 ; Vol. 49, No. 1. pp. 114-129.
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