Detecting the point of impact on an anisotropic cylindrical surface using only four acoustic sensors

T. Hajzargarbashi, H. Nakatani, Tribikram Kundu, N. Takeda

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

An optimization based technique for detecting the point of impact on isotropic and anisotropic plates was developed by Kundu and his associates. Acoustic sensors attached to the plate record the arrival times of Lamb waves generated at the impact point. An objective function is then minimized to obtain the impact location [1-3]. Recently this technique has been extended to the cylindrical geometry. This optimization based technique has been tested on both flat plates and cylindrical shells made of aluminum [4]. In this paper the impact point on an anisotropic cylindrical shell geometry made of carbon fiber reinforced composite is investigated. One shortcoming of the previous method of requiring a large number of acoustic sensors to obtain the direction dependent velocity profile is also overcome here. In the new method the velocity profile in the anisotropic shell is obtained using only four sensors. Predicted points of impact on the anisotropic cylindrical shell are compared with the actual impact points. Good agreement between the two sets is observed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStructural Health Monitoring 2011: Condition-Based Maintenance and Intelligent Structures - Proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring
Pages562-569
Number of pages8
Volume1
Publication statusPublished - 2011
Event8th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring 2011: Condition-Based Maintenance and Intelligent Structures - Stanford, CA, United States
Duration: Sep 13 2011Sep 15 2011

Other

Other8th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring 2011: Condition-Based Maintenance and Intelligent Structures
CountryUnited States
CityStanford, CA
Period9/13/119/15/11

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Keywords

  • Acoustic emission
  • Cylindrical surface
  • Impact
  • Lamb wave
  • Optimization
  • Passive monitoring

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Hajzargarbashi, T., Nakatani, H., Kundu, T., & Takeda, N. (2011). Detecting the point of impact on an anisotropic cylindrical surface using only four acoustic sensors. In Structural Health Monitoring 2011: Condition-Based Maintenance and Intelligent Structures - Proceedings of the 8th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring (Vol. 1, pp. 562-569)