Detection of a diffusive two-dimensional gas of amphiphiles by lateral force microscopy

Richard K. Workman, Anneliese M. Schmidt, Srinivas Manne

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sparsely adsorbed amphiphiles with high surface mobility play a central role in surfactant spreading and in the nucleation and growth of self-assembled monolayers. Here we show that lateral force microscopy can directly visualize a gas phase of adsorbed long-chain alcohols and fatty acids. The two-dimensional (2D) gas originates from the edge evaporation of dense monolayer domains, transferred to a mica surface by microcontact printing. Monolayer corrals act as 2D containers, eventually saturating the enclosed area with the trapped gas phase. Scratching a small hole in the corral allows the gas to leak out of its container, and monitoring this transport process provides a rough estimate of the surface diffusion constant. Our results suggest that friction measurement and mapping can detect amphiphile densities down to 1% of a monolayer, making this technique useful in studying the early stages of monolayer formation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3248-3253
Number of pages6
JournalLangmuir
Volume19
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2003

Fingerprint

Amphiphiles
containers
Monolayers
Microscopic examination
Gases
vapor phases
microscopy
friction measurement
fatty acids
surface diffusion
mica
gases
printing
Containers
alcohols
surfactants
evaporation
nucleation
acids
Surface diffusion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Colloid and Surface Chemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Detection of a diffusive two-dimensional gas of amphiphiles by lateral force microscopy. / Workman, Richard K.; Schmidt, Anneliese M.; Manne, Srinivas.

In: Langmuir, Vol. 19, No. 8, 15.04.2003, p. 3248-3253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Workman, Richard K. ; Schmidt, Anneliese M. ; Manne, Srinivas. / Detection of a diffusive two-dimensional gas of amphiphiles by lateral force microscopy. In: Langmuir. 2003 ; Vol. 19, No. 8. pp. 3248-3253.
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