Detection of soilborne Alternaria radicina and its occurrence in california carrot fields

Barry M Pryor, R. M. Davis, R. L. Gilbertson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Alternaria radicina, causal agent of black rot disease of carrot, was recovered from soil by plating dilutions on a semi-selective medium, A. radicina semi-selective agar. The efficiency of this soil assay was 93% based on recovery of the fungus from non-infested field soil amended with A. radicina conidia. Soilborne A. radicina was recovered from five of six carrot-growing areas in California, but was only commonly found in the Cuyama Valley, where the fungus was detected in 83% of sampled fields. Over a 3-year period of sampling, A. radicina soil populations in Cuyama Valley fields prior to carrot planting ranged from 0 to 317 CFU/g. There was a positive correlation between A. radicina soil populations in these fields and the incidence of black rot disease at harvest. A. radicina was recovered from dry soil after 4 years of storage, and the fungus survived in this soil as solitary conidia or as conidia associated with organic debris.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)891-895
Number of pages5
JournalPlant Disease
Volume82
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Alternaria radicina
carrots
conidia
soil
valleys
fungi
soil fungi
selective media
agar
planting
incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Plant Science

Cite this

Detection of soilborne Alternaria radicina and its occurrence in california carrot fields. / Pryor, Barry M; Davis, R. M.; Gilbertson, R. L.

In: Plant Disease, Vol. 82, No. 8, 08.1998, p. 891-895.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pryor, Barry M ; Davis, R. M. ; Gilbertson, R. L. / Detection of soilborne Alternaria radicina and its occurrence in california carrot fields. In: Plant Disease. 1998 ; Vol. 82, No. 8. pp. 891-895.
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