Developing attachments to new political institutions: A multi-level model of attitude formation in post-Communist Europe

Gerhard Loewenberg, William T Mishler, Howard Sanborn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

In America and Western Europe, legislatures preceded democratization and contributed to the establishment and maintenance of democratic regimes in the late 18th and the 19th centuries. In Central and Eastern Europe in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, legislatures and democratic regimes appeared simultaneously. In the first 15 years of post-Communist transitions in 12 countries, attachments to the new regimes have been influenced by their institutional structures, their economic performance, and their records in protecting human freedom, while attachment to the new parliaments have been predominantly influenced by cultural factors related to early life socialization including education, age, gender, social status, and attitudes toward the former communist regime. Attachment to parliament was a product more than a cause of attachment to the new regimes, but the parliamentary system of government created a context that contributed to citizens’ attachment to their new political institutions. In that respect, attitudes toward parliaments in Central and Eastern Europe played a role similar to the role that these attitudes played in an earlier stage of democratization in Europe and North America, the role of attaching citizens to new political institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-494
Number of pages20
JournalEuropean Political Science Review
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2010

Keywords

  • democratization
  • multi-level models
  • post-communist legislatures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Political Science and International Relations

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