Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems

Sarah M. Durant, Matthew S. Becker, Scott Creel, Sultana Bashir, Amy J. Dickman, Roseline C. Beudels-Jamar, Laly Lichtenfeld, Ray Hilborn, Jake Wall, George Wittemyer, Lkhagvasuren Badamjav, Stephen Blake, Luigi Boitani, Christine Breitenmoser, Femke Broekhuis, David A Christianson, Gabriele Cozzi, Tim R B Davenport, James Deutsch, Pierre DevillersLuke Dollar, Stephanie Dolrenry, Iain Douglas-Hamilton, Egil Dro¨ge, Emily Fitzherbert, Charles Foley, Leela Hazzah, J. Grant C Hopcraft, Dennis Ikanda, Andrew Jacobson, Dereck Joubert, Marcella J. Kelly, James Milanzi, Nicholas Mitchell, Jassiel M'Soka, Maurus Msuha, Thandiwe Mweetwa, Julius Nyahongo, Elias Rosenblatt, Paul Schuette, Claudio Sillero-Zubiri, Anthony R E Sinclair, Mark R. Stanley Price, Alexandra Zimmermann, Nathalie Pettorelli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In dryland ecosystems, mobility is essential for both wildlife and people to access unpredictable and spatially heterogeneous resources, particularly in the face of climate change. Fences can prevent connectivity vital for this mobility. There are recent calls for large-scale barrier fencing interventions to address human-wildlife conflict and illegal resource extraction. Fencing has costs and benefits to people and wildlife. However, the evidence available for facilitating sound decision-making for fencing initiatives is limited, particularly for drylands. We identify six research areas that are key to informing evaluations of fencing initiatives: economics, edge permeability, reserve design, connectivity, ecosystem services and communities. Policy implications. Implementing this research agenda to evaluate fencing interventions in dryland ecosystems will enable better management and policy decisions. The United Nations Conventions on Migratory Species (CMS) and to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) are appropriate international agreements for moving this agenda forward and leading the development of policies and guidelines on fencing in drylands. Implementing this research agenda to evaluate fencing interventions in dryland ecosystems will enable better management and policy decisions. The United Nations Conventions on Migratory Species (CMS) and to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) are appropriate international agreements for moving this agenda forward and leading the development of policies and guidelines on fencing in drylands.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)544-551
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Ecology
Volume52
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2015

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ecosystem
migratory species
international agreement
desertification
United Nations
connectivity
reserve design
resource
ecosystem service
decision making
policy
permeability
climate change
economics
cost
wildlife
decision
convention
sound
evaluation

Keywords

  • Barriers
  • Biodiversity conservation
  • Conservation policy
  • Deserts
  • Ecosystem function
  • Management interventions
  • Migration
  • Nomadic pastoralism
  • Rangelands
  • Transhumance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology

Cite this

Durant, S. M., Becker, M. S., Creel, S., Bashir, S., Dickman, A. J., Beudels-Jamar, R. C., ... Pettorelli, N. (2015). Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems. Journal of Applied Ecology, 52(3), 544-551. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12415

Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems. / Durant, Sarah M.; Becker, Matthew S.; Creel, Scott; Bashir, Sultana; Dickman, Amy J.; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline C.; Lichtenfeld, Laly; Hilborn, Ray; Wall, Jake; Wittemyer, George; Badamjav, Lkhagvasuren; Blake, Stephen; Boitani, Luigi; Breitenmoser, Christine; Broekhuis, Femke; Christianson, David A; Cozzi, Gabriele; Davenport, Tim R B; Deutsch, James; Devillers, Pierre; Dollar, Luke; Dolrenry, Stephanie; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain; Dro¨ge, Egil; Fitzherbert, Emily; Foley, Charles; Hazzah, Leela; Hopcraft, J. Grant C; Ikanda, Dennis; Jacobson, Andrew; Joubert, Dereck; Kelly, Marcella J.; Milanzi, James; Mitchell, Nicholas; M'Soka, Jassiel; Msuha, Maurus; Mweetwa, Thandiwe; Nyahongo, Julius; Rosenblatt, Elias; Schuette, Paul; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio; Sinclair, Anthony R E; Stanley Price, Mark R.; Zimmermann, Alexandra; Pettorelli, Nathalie.

In: Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 52, No. 3, 01.06.2015, p. 544-551.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Durant, SM, Becker, MS, Creel, S, Bashir, S, Dickman, AJ, Beudels-Jamar, RC, Lichtenfeld, L, Hilborn, R, Wall, J, Wittemyer, G, Badamjav, L, Blake, S, Boitani, L, Breitenmoser, C, Broekhuis, F, Christianson, DA, Cozzi, G, Davenport, TRB, Deutsch, J, Devillers, P, Dollar, L, Dolrenry, S, Douglas-Hamilton, I, Dro¨ge, E, Fitzherbert, E, Foley, C, Hazzah, L, Hopcraft, JGC, Ikanda, D, Jacobson, A, Joubert, D, Kelly, MJ, Milanzi, J, Mitchell, N, M'Soka, J, Msuha, M, Mweetwa, T, Nyahongo, J, Rosenblatt, E, Schuette, P, Sillero-Zubiri, C, Sinclair, ARE, Stanley Price, MR, Zimmermann, A & Pettorelli, N 2015, 'Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems', Journal of Applied Ecology, vol. 52, no. 3, pp. 544-551. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12415
Durant SM, Becker MS, Creel S, Bashir S, Dickman AJ, Beudels-Jamar RC et al. Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems. Journal of Applied Ecology. 2015 Jun 1;52(3):544-551. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2664.12415
Durant, Sarah M. ; Becker, Matthew S. ; Creel, Scott ; Bashir, Sultana ; Dickman, Amy J. ; Beudels-Jamar, Roseline C. ; Lichtenfeld, Laly ; Hilborn, Ray ; Wall, Jake ; Wittemyer, George ; Badamjav, Lkhagvasuren ; Blake, Stephen ; Boitani, Luigi ; Breitenmoser, Christine ; Broekhuis, Femke ; Christianson, David A ; Cozzi, Gabriele ; Davenport, Tim R B ; Deutsch, James ; Devillers, Pierre ; Dollar, Luke ; Dolrenry, Stephanie ; Douglas-Hamilton, Iain ; Dro¨ge, Egil ; Fitzherbert, Emily ; Foley, Charles ; Hazzah, Leela ; Hopcraft, J. Grant C ; Ikanda, Dennis ; Jacobson, Andrew ; Joubert, Dereck ; Kelly, Marcella J. ; Milanzi, James ; Mitchell, Nicholas ; M'Soka, Jassiel ; Msuha, Maurus ; Mweetwa, Thandiwe ; Nyahongo, Julius ; Rosenblatt, Elias ; Schuette, Paul ; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio ; Sinclair, Anthony R E ; Stanley Price, Mark R. ; Zimmermann, Alexandra ; Pettorelli, Nathalie. / Developing fencing policies for dryland ecosystems. In: Journal of Applied Ecology. 2015 ; Vol. 52, No. 3. pp. 544-551.
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