Developing linear dark-field control for exoplanet direct imaging in the laboratory and on ground-based telescopes

Thayne Currie, Eugene Pluzhnik, Ruslan Belikov, Olivier Guyon

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Imaging rocky planets in reflected light, a key focus of future NASA missions and ELTs, requires advanced wavefront control to maintain a deep, temporally correlated null of stellar halo at just several diffraction beam widths. We discuss development of Linear Dark Field Control (LDFC) to achieve this aim. We describe efforts to test spatial LDFC in a laboratory setting for the first time, using the Ames Coronagraph Experiment (ACE) testbed. Our preliminary results indicate that spatial LDFC is a promising method focal-plane wavefront control method capable of maintaining a static dark hole, at least at contrasts relevant for imaging mature planets with 30m-class telescopes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationTechniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets IX
EditorsStuart B. Shaklan
PublisherSPIE
ISBN (Electronic)9781510629271
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
Externally publishedYes
EventTechniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets IX 2019 - San Diego, United States
Duration: Aug 12 2019Aug 15 2019

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume11117
ISSN (Print)0277-786X
ISSN (Electronic)1996-756X

Conference

ConferenceTechniques and Instrumentation for Detection of Exoplanets IX 2019
CountryUnited States
CitySan Diego
Period8/12/198/15/19

Keywords

  • Adaptive Optics
  • Direct Imaging
  • Extrasolar Planets
  • Methods
  • Wavefront Control

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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