Development of a real-time fleet cost tool as part of an integrated remote mine control centre

M. A. Antuñano, S. D. Dessureault

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In large coal strip mines, there are many different processes at work: stripping, overburden removal using trucks/shovels, cast blasting, slot dozer pushing, more fragmentation and further truck/shovel benches. A key component to each of these steps is the use of machines. In modern operations, most machine costs are tracked within Enterprise systems that transact costs and repair work order management. Similarly, in contemporary mines most machines are tracked using technology that provides precise performance measures for each key process. Such technologies include productivity monitors on draglines, dozers and drills and fleet management systems for trucks and shovels. Linking these two sources of seemingly disparate data - costs and performance by machine - would allow for the precise calculation of unit costs by specific machine. This is similar to an activity-based costing system, except in this machine-based system, calculations are made at an even finer granular level. There are many uses for such an integrated information system in mine planning and performance management, both in real-time and through historical analysis. A real-time fleet costs (FLC) measurement process was developed as part of a larger blending-related, multi-million dollar project centred on a centralised remote control room developed at the University of Arizona's Mining Information Systems and Operations Management Mine Control Center. The FLC component of the overall blending system would allow a mine controller to manage the equipment fleet by viewing its cost in real time and, when mixed with other revenue-related components, the exact profit. For example, a mine controller may show high utilisation while still maintaining a production surplus. This could occur, for example, if the equipment is driven long distances. This might appear in traditional performance metrics as 'high production performance', but in reality may prove less profitable. This paper discusses the technical development of the FLC, its deployment and its impact on controller performance, and compares mine profitability before and after its application.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication35th APCOM Symposium - Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, Proceedings
Pages789-793
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011
Event35th International Symposium of Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, APCOM - Wollongong, NSW, Australia
Duration: Sep 24 2011Sep 30 2011

Publication series

Name35th APCOM Symposium - Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, Proceedings

Other

Other35th International Symposium of Application of Computers and Operations Research in the Minerals Industry, APCOM
Country/TerritoryAustralia
CityWollongong, NSW
Period9/24/119/30/11

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management Science and Operations Research

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