Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy

DeWayne T. Halfen, Aldo J. Apponi, Lucy M Ziurys

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Experimental exercises have been developed for undergraduate and graduate chemistry, astronomy, biology, and biochemistry students to teach basic principles in physical chemistry using the interstellar medium as the laboratory. Employing a radio telescope, in this case the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12m antenna, the physical and chemical properties of interstellar gas are investigated by measuring spectra of molecules such as HCO+, HCN, HC3N, CH3CN, and SiO in astronomical sources. For example, laboratory exercises have been created for graduate students with life sciences backgrounds that investigate the nature of organic chemistry in interstellar clouds. Additional laboratories are being developed to teach astronomy graduate and undergraduate students about practical aspects of molecular astrophysics and spectroscopy. Basic chemical principles are thus illustrated through an interesting, non-traditional approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationACS Symposium Series
PublisherAmerican Chemical Society
Pages363-377
Number of pages15
Volume981
ISBN (Print)9780841274310
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 15 2008

Publication series

NameACS Symposium Series
Volume981
ISSN (Print)00976156
ISSN (Electronic)19475918

Fingerprint

Laboratory Chemicals
Radio astronomy
Teaching
Astronomy
Students
Radio telescopes
Physical chemistry
Astrophysics
Biochemistry
Observatories
Chemical properties
Physical properties
Gases
Spectroscopy
Antennas
Molecules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Halfen, D. T., Apponi, A. J., & Ziurys, L. M. (2008). Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy. In ACS Symposium Series (Vol. 981, pp. 363-377). (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 981). American Chemical Society. https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2008-0981.ch021

Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy. / Halfen, DeWayne T.; Apponi, Aldo J.; Ziurys, Lucy M.

ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 981 American Chemical Society, 2008. p. 363-377 (ACS Symposium Series; Vol. 981).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Halfen, DT, Apponi, AJ & Ziurys, LM 2008, Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy. in ACS Symposium Series. vol. 981, ACS Symposium Series, vol. 981, American Chemical Society, pp. 363-377. https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2008-0981.ch021
Halfen DT, Apponi AJ, Ziurys LM. Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy. In ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 981. American Chemical Society. 2008. p. 363-377. (ACS Symposium Series). https://doi.org/10.1021/bk-2008-0981.ch021
Halfen, DeWayne T. ; Apponi, Aldo J. ; Ziurys, Lucy M. / Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy. ACS Symposium Series. Vol. 981 American Chemical Society, 2008. pp. 363-377 (ACS Symposium Series).
@inproceedings{b7478febd43f424b964a9c4f275eb878,
title = "Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy",
abstract = "Experimental exercises have been developed for undergraduate and graduate chemistry, astronomy, biology, and biochemistry students to teach basic principles in physical chemistry using the interstellar medium as the laboratory. Employing a radio telescope, in this case the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12m antenna, the physical and chemical properties of interstellar gas are investigated by measuring spectra of molecules such as HCO+, HCN, HC3N, CH3CN, and SiO in astronomical sources. For example, laboratory exercises have been created for graduate students with life sciences backgrounds that investigate the nature of organic chemistry in interstellar clouds. Additional laboratories are being developed to teach astronomy graduate and undergraduate students about practical aspects of molecular astrophysics and spectroscopy. Basic chemical principles are thus illustrated through an interesting, non-traditional approach.",
author = "Halfen, {DeWayne T.} and Apponi, {Aldo J.} and Ziurys, {Lucy M}",
year = "2008",
month = "2",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1021/bk-2008-0981.ch021",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9780841274310",
volume = "981",
series = "ACS Symposium Series",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",
pages = "363--377",
booktitle = "ACS Symposium Series",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Development of laboratories for teaching chemical principles using radio astronomy

AU - Halfen, DeWayne T.

AU - Apponi, Aldo J.

AU - Ziurys, Lucy M

PY - 2008/2/15

Y1 - 2008/2/15

N2 - Experimental exercises have been developed for undergraduate and graduate chemistry, astronomy, biology, and biochemistry students to teach basic principles in physical chemistry using the interstellar medium as the laboratory. Employing a radio telescope, in this case the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12m antenna, the physical and chemical properties of interstellar gas are investigated by measuring spectra of molecules such as HCO+, HCN, HC3N, CH3CN, and SiO in astronomical sources. For example, laboratory exercises have been created for graduate students with life sciences backgrounds that investigate the nature of organic chemistry in interstellar clouds. Additional laboratories are being developed to teach astronomy graduate and undergraduate students about practical aspects of molecular astrophysics and spectroscopy. Basic chemical principles are thus illustrated through an interesting, non-traditional approach.

AB - Experimental exercises have been developed for undergraduate and graduate chemistry, astronomy, biology, and biochemistry students to teach basic principles in physical chemistry using the interstellar medium as the laboratory. Employing a radio telescope, in this case the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) 12m antenna, the physical and chemical properties of interstellar gas are investigated by measuring spectra of molecules such as HCO+, HCN, HC3N, CH3CN, and SiO in astronomical sources. For example, laboratory exercises have been created for graduate students with life sciences backgrounds that investigate the nature of organic chemistry in interstellar clouds. Additional laboratories are being developed to teach astronomy graduate and undergraduate students about practical aspects of molecular astrophysics and spectroscopy. Basic chemical principles are thus illustrated through an interesting, non-traditional approach.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84905589843&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84905589843&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/bk-2008-0981.ch021

DO - 10.1021/bk-2008-0981.ch021

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:84905589843

SN - 9780841274310

VL - 981

T3 - ACS Symposium Series

SP - 363

EP - 377

BT - ACS Symposium Series

PB - American Chemical Society

ER -