Development of surface metrology for the Giant Magellan Telescope primary mirror

J. H. Burge, W. Davison, H. M. Martin, C. Zhao

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

The Giant Magellan Telescope achieves 25 meter aperture and modest length using an f/0.7 primary mirror made from 8.4 meter diameter segments. The systems that will be used for measuring the aspheric optical surfaces of these mirrors are in the final phase of development. This paper discusses the overall metrology plan and shows details for the development of the principal test system - a system that uses mirrors and holograms to provide a null interferometric test of the surface. This system provides a full aperture interferometric measurement of the off-axis segments by compensating the 14.5 mm aspheric departure with a tilted 3.8-m diameter powered mirror, a 77 cm tilted mirror, and a computer generated hologram. The interferometric measurements are corroborated with a scanning slope measurement from a scanning pentaprism system and a direct measurement system based on a laser tracker.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvanced Optical and Mechanical Technologies in Telescopes and Instrumentation
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 21 2008
EventAdvanced Optical and Mechanical Technologies in Telescopes and Instrumentation - Marseille, France
Duration: Jun 23 2008Jun 28 2008

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume7018
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherAdvanced Optical and Mechanical Technologies in Telescopes and Instrumentation
CountryFrance
CityMarseille
Period6/23/086/28/08

Keywords

  • Aspheres
  • Optical fabrication
  • Optical testing
  • Telescopes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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