Developmental comparisons of boars and barrows: II. Body composition and bone development.

B. K. Knudson, M. G. Hogberg, R. A. Merkel, R. E. Allen, W. T. Magee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Differences in total carcass bone, muscle and fat, and linear measurements of the tibia and radius were evaluated in barrows at 105 kg and boars at 105, 118, 132 and 145 kg live body weight. The carcasses of five replicates were physically separated into skin, bone and soft tissues, and the linear measurements of the tibia and radius were obtained on seven replicates. At live weight of 105 kg, boars did not differ significantly in fat-free muscle, but they had 33.2% less fat, 11% greater bone weight and 14% greater skin weight than barrows. At 145 kg, boars had total carcass fat weight comparable with 105-kg barrows. Fat-free muscle, bone and skin weight of boars increased at linear rates of .41, .083 and .104 kg/kg of body weight increase from 105 to 145 kg, respectively. At 105 kg, density and length of the tibia and radius did not differ between boars and barrows. The tibia of boars were heavier than those of barrows at 105 kg, resulting in a greater ratio of tibia weight to length (indirect measure of bone thickness). As boars increased in live weight from 105 to 145 kg, total weight and length of the tibia and radius increased linearly. The ratio of weight to length of the tibia and radius increased during this 40-kg weight gain, indicating that weight of both bones increased at a greater rate than length. These results indicate that boars and barrows have the same weight of total carcass fat when boars are 40 kg heavier than the barrows. The greater bone weight of boar carcasses compared with barrows is due to greater bone thickness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)797-801
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1985
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Developmental comparisons of boars and barrows: II. Body composition and bone development.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this