Diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence in geriatric patients

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In most cases, the evaluation of urinary incontinence requires only a history, a physical examination, urinalysis and measurement of postvoid residual urine volume. The initial purposes of the evaluation are to identify conditions requiring referral or specialized work-up and to detect and treat reversible causes that may be present. If the patient does not appear to require referral and a reversible cause is not identified, the next step is to categorize the patient's symptoms as typical of either urge or stress incontinence and treat the patient accordingly. If treatment fails or a presumptive diagnosis of urge or stress incontinence cannot be reached, the final step would be to perform more sophisticated tests or refer the patient for testing to define the cause and determine the best treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2675-2684
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume57
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jun 1 1998
Externally publishedYes

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Urinary Incontinence
Geriatrics
Referral and Consultation
Residual Volume
Urinalysis
Physical Examination
History
Urine
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Diagnostic evaluation of urinary incontinence in geriatric patients. / Weiss, Barry D.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 57, No. 11, 01.06.1998, p. 2675-2684.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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