Diameters and albedos of thirty-six asteroids

Robert H. Brown, David Morrison

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Radiometric diameters and albedos of 36 asteroids, most previously unmeasured by this technique, are reported. These objects were selected primarily to resolve taxonomic ambiguities resulting from the lack of albedo information. Of the sample of 36, most are of the common types C, S, and M, but also represented are types A, D, F, and P. One object, 214 Aschera, is of the rare E type (only the fourth of its kind known); 87 Sylvia is the largest known member of the P class; and albedo combined with Arizona eight-color data from Tholen (1983, Asteroid Taxonomy from Cluster Analysis of Photometry: Implications for Origin and Evolution of the Asteroid Belt. PhD dissertation, University of Arizona, Tucson) indicate that 336 Lacadiera is of type D, one of the few members of this class found in the main asteroid belt, and a prime candidate for future space missions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-24
Number of pages5
JournalIcarus
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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asteroids
albedo
asteroid
asteroid belts
taxonomy
cluster analysis
space missions
ambiguity
photometry
color

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cite this

Diameters and albedos of thirty-six asteroids. / Brown, Robert H.; Morrison, David.

In: Icarus, Vol. 59, No. 1, 1984, p. 20-24.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, Robert H. ; Morrison, David. / Diameters and albedos of thirty-six asteroids. In: Icarus. 1984 ; Vol. 59, No. 1. pp. 20-24.
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