Diet and sex modify exercise and cardiac adaptation in the mouse

John Konhilas, Hao Chen, Elizabeth Luczak, Laurel A. McKee, Jessica Regan, Peter A. Watson, Brian L. Stauffer, Zain I Khalpey, Timothy A. McKinsey, Todd Horn, Bonnie Lafleur, Leslie A. Leinwand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The heart adapts to exercise stimuli in a sex-dimorphic manner when mice are fed the traditional soy-based chow. Females undergo more voluntary exercise (4 wk) than males and exhibit more cardiac hypertrophy per kilometer run (18, 32). We have found that diet plays a critical role in cage wheel exercise and cardiac adaptation to the exercise stimulus in this sex dimorphism. Specifically, feeding male mice a casein-based, soy-free diet increases daily running distance over soy-fed counterparts to equal that of females. Moreover, casein-fed males have a greater capacity to increase their cardiac mass in response to exercise compared with soy-fed males. To further explore the biochemical mechanisms for these differences, we performed a candidate-based RT-PCR screen on genes previously implicated in diet-or exercise-based cardiac hypertrophy. Of the genes screened, many exhibit significant exercise, diet, or sex effects but only transforming growth factor-β1 shows a significant three-way interaction with no genes showing a two-way interaction. Finally, we show that the expression and activity of adenosine monophosphate-activated kinase-α2 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase is dependent on exercise, diet, and sex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H135-H145
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume308
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Diet
Cardiomegaly
Caseins
Genes
Transforming Growth Factors
Adenosine Monophosphate
Sex Characteristics
Running
Polymerase Chain Reaction

Keywords

  • Cardiac hypertrophy
  • Diet
  • Sex and exercise
  • Soy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Diet and sex modify exercise and cardiac adaptation in the mouse. / Konhilas, John; Chen, Hao; Luczak, Elizabeth; McKee, Laurel A.; Regan, Jessica; Watson, Peter A.; Stauffer, Brian L.; Khalpey, Zain I; McKinsey, Timothy A.; Horn, Todd; Lafleur, Bonnie; Leinwand, Leslie A.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Vol. 308, No. 2, 2015, p. H135-H145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Konhilas, J, Chen, H, Luczak, E, McKee, LA, Regan, J, Watson, PA, Stauffer, BL, Khalpey, ZI, McKinsey, TA, Horn, T, Lafleur, B & Leinwand, LA 2015, 'Diet and sex modify exercise and cardiac adaptation in the mouse', American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology, vol. 308, no. 2, pp. H135-H145. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.00532.2014
Konhilas, John ; Chen, Hao ; Luczak, Elizabeth ; McKee, Laurel A. ; Regan, Jessica ; Watson, Peter A. ; Stauffer, Brian L. ; Khalpey, Zain I ; McKinsey, Timothy A. ; Horn, Todd ; Lafleur, Bonnie ; Leinwand, Leslie A. / Diet and sex modify exercise and cardiac adaptation in the mouse. In: American Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2015 ; Vol. 308, No. 2. pp. H135-H145.
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