Dietary vitamin E modulation of cytokine production by splenocytes and thymocytes from alcohol-fed mice

Y. Wang, D. S. Huang, Ronald R Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

As vitamin E enhances immune responses, it may reduce dietary ethanol (EtOH)-induced immune suppression, thereby favorably affecting host disease resistance. The effects of dietary vitamin E at higher level in alcohol-fed female C57BL/6 mice was determined via in vitro cytokine production by splenocytes and thymocytes, and some other immune functions. A 15-fold increase of vitamin E (160 IU/liter) in a liquid diet (National Council Research), with or without EtOH (4.5%, v/v), was fed to mice for 10 weeks. Vitamin E supplementation restored production of interleukin-2, -5, -6, -10, and interferon-γ by concanavalin A (Con A)-stimulated splenocytes and interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated splenocytes, which were suppressed by dietary EtOH. However, it had no effect on interleukin-4 secretion, which was also reduced by splenocytes from EtOH- fed mice. Vitamin E supplementation also restored EtOH-suppressed, mitogen- induced splenocyte proliferation, but not thymocyte proliferation, although it slightly increased production of immunoglobulin A and G by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated splenocytes, which were suppressed by dietary EtOH. Dietary vitamin E, furthermore, significantly increased interleukin-2 and -6 secretion by Con A-stimulated thymocytes, which were suppressed by dietary EtOH, although it had no effect on interleukin-4 and interferon-γ production by Con A-stimulated thymocytes from EtOH-fed mice. These data suggest that dietary vitamin E supplementation can modulate dysregulation of cytokines initiated by dietary EtOH and restore immune dysfunctions induced by EtOH ingestion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-362
Number of pages8
JournalAlcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research
Volume18
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1994

Fingerprint

Thymocytes
Vitamin E
Alcohols
Modulation
Cytokines
Concanavalin A
Interleukin-4
Interferons
Interleukin-2
Lipopolysaccharides
Interleukin-6
Disease Resistance
Interleukin-5
Nutrition
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Mitogens
Immunoglobulin A
Ethanol
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Eating

Keywords

  • Cytokines
  • Ethanol
  • Immunoglobulin
  • T-Cell Maturation
  • Vitamin E

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Toxicology

Cite this

Dietary vitamin E modulation of cytokine production by splenocytes and thymocytes from alcohol-fed mice. / Wang, Y.; Huang, D. S.; Watson, Ronald R.

In: Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, Vol. 18, No. 2, 1994, p. 355-362.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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