Differences in metal concentration by particle size in house dust and soil

Paloma Beamer, Christina A. Elish, Denise Roe, Miranda M Loh, David W. Layton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The majority of particles that adhere to hands are <63 μm in diameter yet risk assessments for soil remediation are typically based on soil samples sieved to <250 μm. The objective of our study was to determine if there is a significant difference in metal concentration by particle size in both house dust and soil. We obtained indoor dust and yard soil samples from 10 houses in Tucson, Arizona. All samples were sieved to <63 μm and 63 to <150 μm and analyzed for 30 elements via ICP-MS following nitric acid digestion. We conducted t-tests of the log-transformed data to assess for significant differences that were adjusted with a Bonferroni correction to account for multiple comparisons. In house dust, significant differences in concentration were observed for Be, Al, and Mo between particles sizes, with a higher concentration observed in the smaller particle sizes. Significant differences were also determined for Mg, Ca, Cr, Co, Cu, Ge, Zr, Ag, Ba, and Pb concentration in yard soil samples, with the higher concentration observed in the smaller particles size for each element. The results of this exploratory study indicate that current risk assessment practices for soil remediation may under estimate non-dietary ingestion exposure. This is of particular concern for young children who are more vulnerable to this exposure route due to their high hand mouthing frequencies. Additional studies with a greater number of samples and wider geographic distribution with different climates and soil types should be completed to determine the most relevant sampling practices for risk assessment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)839-844
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Environmental Monitoring
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2012

Fingerprint

Dust
Particle Size
Soil
Metals
Particle size
particle size
dust
Soils
soil remediation
risk assessment
metal
Risk assessment
soil
acid digestion
Remediation
nitric acid
Hand
soil type
Nitric Acid
Climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Differences in metal concentration by particle size in house dust and soil. / Beamer, Paloma; Elish, Christina A.; Roe, Denise; Loh, Miranda M; Layton, David W.

In: Journal of Environmental Monitoring, Vol. 14, No. 3, 03.2012, p. 839-844.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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