Direct and Indirect Effects of Newlywed Couples' Neuroticism and Stressful Events on Marital Satisfaction Through Mutual Problem Solving

Alesia Woszidlo, Chris Segrin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This investigation examined the role of neuroticism, stressful experiences, and mutual problem solving in newlywed couples' marital satisfaction. The vulnerability-stress-adaptation model of marital development was used as the basis of the proposed hypotheses. Dyadic analyses and tests of indirect effects were performed on data from 186 couples in the first 5 years of their marriage. Results indicate that husbands' and wives' work, job-home interference, and family stress were significantly associated with their own lower marital satisfaction. Significant partner effects further indicated that husbands' and wives' family stress was negatively associated with the marital satisfaction of their partner. Additionally, the relationships between (1) neuroticism and marital satisfaction and (2) stressful events and marital satisfaction can be partially explained by mutual problem solving for both husbands and wives. This study emphasizes the important role of problem-solving communication in newlywed couples' experiences of stressful events and marital satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)520-545
Number of pages26
JournalMarriage and Family Review
Volume49
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2013

Keywords

  • communication
  • marriage
  • quantitative research
  • stress
  • work and family

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Direct and Indirect Effects of Newlywed Couples' Neuroticism and Stressful Events on Marital Satisfaction Through Mutual Problem Solving'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this