Dissipation of stop-and-go waves via control of autonomous vehicles: Field experiments

Raphael E. Stern, Shumo Cui, Maria Laura Delle Monache, Rahul Bhadani, Matt Bunting, Miles Churchill, Nathaniel Hamilton, R'mani Haulcy, Hannah Pohlmann, Fangyu Wu, Benedetto Piccoli, Benjamin Seibold, Jonathan Sprinkle, Daniel B. Work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traffic waves are phenomena that emerge when the vehicular density exceeds a critical threshold. Considering the presence of increasingly automated vehicles in the traffic stream, a number of research activities have focused on the influence of automated vehicles on the bulk traffic flow. In the present article, we demonstrate experimentally that intelligent control of an autonomous vehicle is able to dampen stop-and-go waves that can arise even in the absence of geometric or lane changing triggers. Precisely, our experiments on a circular track with more than 20 vehicles show that traffic waves emerge consistently, and that they can be dampened by controlling the velocity of a single vehicle in the flow. We compare metrics for velocity, braking events, and fuel economy across experiments. These experimental findings suggest a paradigm shift in traffic management: flow control will be possible via a few mobile actuators (less than 5%) long before a majority of vehicles have autonomous capabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)205-221
Number of pages17
JournalTransportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies
Volume89
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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traffic
experiment
Experiments
Intelligent control
Fuel economy
Braking
Flow control
paradigm
Actuators
economy
event
management

Keywords

  • Autonomous vehicles
  • Traffic control
  • Traffic waves

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Automotive Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Stern, R. E., Cui, S., Delle Monache, M. L., Bhadani, R., Bunting, M., Churchill, M., ... Work, D. B. (2018). Dissipation of stop-and-go waves via control of autonomous vehicles: Field experiments. Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, 89, 205-221. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trc.2018.02.005

Dissipation of stop-and-go waves via control of autonomous vehicles : Field experiments. / Stern, Raphael E.; Cui, Shumo; Delle Monache, Maria Laura; Bhadani, Rahul; Bunting, Matt; Churchill, Miles; Hamilton, Nathaniel; Haulcy, R'mani; Pohlmann, Hannah; Wu, Fangyu; Piccoli, Benedetto; Seibold, Benjamin; Sprinkle, Jonathan; Work, Daniel B.

In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, Vol. 89, 01.04.2018, p. 205-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stern, RE, Cui, S, Delle Monache, ML, Bhadani, R, Bunting, M, Churchill, M, Hamilton, N, Haulcy, R, Pohlmann, H, Wu, F, Piccoli, B, Seibold, B, Sprinkle, J & Work, DB 2018, 'Dissipation of stop-and-go waves via control of autonomous vehicles: Field experiments' Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies, vol. 89, pp. 205-221. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.trc.2018.02.005
Stern, Raphael E. ; Cui, Shumo ; Delle Monache, Maria Laura ; Bhadani, Rahul ; Bunting, Matt ; Churchill, Miles ; Hamilton, Nathaniel ; Haulcy, R'mani ; Pohlmann, Hannah ; Wu, Fangyu ; Piccoli, Benedetto ; Seibold, Benjamin ; Sprinkle, Jonathan ; Work, Daniel B. / Dissipation of stop-and-go waves via control of autonomous vehicles : Field experiments. In: Transportation Research Part C: Emerging Technologies. 2018 ; Vol. 89. pp. 205-221.
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