Distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans: A study of Athapaskan population history

Ripan Singh Malhi, Angelica Gonzalez-Oliver, Kari Britt Schroeder, Brian M. Kemp, Jonathan A. Greenberg, Solomon Z. Dobrowski, David Glenn Smith, Andres Resendez, Tatiana Karafet, Michael F Hammer, Stephen Zegura, Tatiana Brovko

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study, 231 Y chromosomes from 12 populations were typed for four diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to determine haplogroup membership and 43 Y chromosomes from three of these populations were typed for eight short tandem repeats (STRs) to determine haplotypes. These data were combined with previously published data, amounting to 724 Y chromosomes from 26 populations in North America, and analyzed to investigate the geographic distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans and to test the Southern Athapaskan migration hypothesis. The results suggest that European admixture has significantly altered the distribution of Y chromosomes in North America and because of this caution should be taken when inferring prehistoric population events in North America using Y chromosome data alone. However, consistent with studies of other genetic systems, we are still able to identify close relationships among Y chromosomes in Athapaskans from the Subarctic and the Southwest, suggesting that a small number of proto-Apachean migrants from the Subarctic founded the Southwest Athapaskan populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-424
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Physical Anthropology
Volume137
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2008

Fingerprint

North American Indians
Y Chromosome
history
Population
North America
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 12
diagnostic
migrant
migration
Microsatellite Repeats
Haplotypes
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
event

Keywords

  • Diffusion
  • European contact
  • Founder effect
  • Migration
  • Mitochondrial DNA
  • Native American
  • Y chromosome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anthropology
  • Anatomy

Cite this

Malhi, R. S., Gonzalez-Oliver, A., Schroeder, K. B., Kemp, B. M., Greenberg, J. A., Dobrowski, S. Z., ... Brovko, T. (2008). Distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans: A study of Athapaskan population history. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 137(4), 412-424. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.20883

Distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans : A study of Athapaskan population history. / Malhi, Ripan Singh; Gonzalez-Oliver, Angelica; Schroeder, Kari Britt; Kemp, Brian M.; Greenberg, Jonathan A.; Dobrowski, Solomon Z.; Smith, David Glenn; Resendez, Andres; Karafet, Tatiana; Hammer, Michael F; Zegura, Stephen; Brovko, Tatiana.

In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology, Vol. 137, No. 4, 12.2008, p. 412-424.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Malhi, RS, Gonzalez-Oliver, A, Schroeder, KB, Kemp, BM, Greenberg, JA, Dobrowski, SZ, Smith, DG, Resendez, A, Karafet, T, Hammer, MF, Zegura, S & Brovko, T 2008, 'Distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans: A study of Athapaskan population history', American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 137, no. 4, pp. 412-424. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajpa.20883
Malhi, Ripan Singh ; Gonzalez-Oliver, Angelica ; Schroeder, Kari Britt ; Kemp, Brian M. ; Greenberg, Jonathan A. ; Dobrowski, Solomon Z. ; Smith, David Glenn ; Resendez, Andres ; Karafet, Tatiana ; Hammer, Michael F ; Zegura, Stephen ; Brovko, Tatiana. / Distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans : A study of Athapaskan population history. In: American Journal of Physical Anthropology. 2008 ; Vol. 137, No. 4. pp. 412-424.
@article{99fe9be210ab4c25a59d61d0f791b4a1,
title = "Distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans: A study of Athapaskan population history",
abstract = "In this study, 231 Y chromosomes from 12 populations were typed for four diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to determine haplogroup membership and 43 Y chromosomes from three of these populations were typed for eight short tandem repeats (STRs) to determine haplotypes. These data were combined with previously published data, amounting to 724 Y chromosomes from 26 populations in North America, and analyzed to investigate the geographic distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans and to test the Southern Athapaskan migration hypothesis. The results suggest that European admixture has significantly altered the distribution of Y chromosomes in North America and because of this caution should be taken when inferring prehistoric population events in North America using Y chromosome data alone. However, consistent with studies of other genetic systems, we are still able to identify close relationships among Y chromosomes in Athapaskans from the Subarctic and the Southwest, suggesting that a small number of proto-Apachean migrants from the Subarctic founded the Southwest Athapaskan populations.",
keywords = "Diffusion, European contact, Founder effect, Migration, Mitochondrial DNA, Native American, Y chromosome",
author = "Malhi, {Ripan Singh} and Angelica Gonzalez-Oliver and Schroeder, {Kari Britt} and Kemp, {Brian M.} and Greenberg, {Jonathan A.} and Dobrowski, {Solomon Z.} and Smith, {David Glenn} and Andres Resendez and Tatiana Karafet and Hammer, {Michael F} and Stephen Zegura and Tatiana Brovko",
year = "2008",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1002/ajpa.20883",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "137",
pages = "412--424",
journal = "American Journal of Physical Anthropology",
issn = "0002-9483",
publisher = "Wiley-Liss Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans

T2 - A study of Athapaskan population history

AU - Malhi, Ripan Singh

AU - Gonzalez-Oliver, Angelica

AU - Schroeder, Kari Britt

AU - Kemp, Brian M.

AU - Greenberg, Jonathan A.

AU - Dobrowski, Solomon Z.

AU - Smith, David Glenn

AU - Resendez, Andres

AU - Karafet, Tatiana

AU - Hammer, Michael F

AU - Zegura, Stephen

AU - Brovko, Tatiana

PY - 2008/12

Y1 - 2008/12

N2 - In this study, 231 Y chromosomes from 12 populations were typed for four diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to determine haplogroup membership and 43 Y chromosomes from three of these populations were typed for eight short tandem repeats (STRs) to determine haplotypes. These data were combined with previously published data, amounting to 724 Y chromosomes from 26 populations in North America, and analyzed to investigate the geographic distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans and to test the Southern Athapaskan migration hypothesis. The results suggest that European admixture has significantly altered the distribution of Y chromosomes in North America and because of this caution should be taken when inferring prehistoric population events in North America using Y chromosome data alone. However, consistent with studies of other genetic systems, we are still able to identify close relationships among Y chromosomes in Athapaskans from the Subarctic and the Southwest, suggesting that a small number of proto-Apachean migrants from the Subarctic founded the Southwest Athapaskan populations.

AB - In this study, 231 Y chromosomes from 12 populations were typed for four diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to determine haplogroup membership and 43 Y chromosomes from three of these populations were typed for eight short tandem repeats (STRs) to determine haplotypes. These data were combined with previously published data, amounting to 724 Y chromosomes from 26 populations in North America, and analyzed to investigate the geographic distribution of Y chromosomes among native North Americans and to test the Southern Athapaskan migration hypothesis. The results suggest that European admixture has significantly altered the distribution of Y chromosomes in North America and because of this caution should be taken when inferring prehistoric population events in North America using Y chromosome data alone. However, consistent with studies of other genetic systems, we are still able to identify close relationships among Y chromosomes in Athapaskans from the Subarctic and the Southwest, suggesting that a small number of proto-Apachean migrants from the Subarctic founded the Southwest Athapaskan populations.

KW - Diffusion

KW - European contact

KW - Founder effect

KW - Migration

KW - Mitochondrial DNA

KW - Native American

KW - Y chromosome

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=57149095111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=57149095111&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/ajpa.20883

DO - 10.1002/ajpa.20883

M3 - Article

C2 - 18618732

AN - SCOPUS:57149095111

VL - 137

SP - 412

EP - 424

JO - American Journal of Physical Anthropology

JF - American Journal of Physical Anthropology

SN - 0002-9483

IS - 4

ER -