Does fetal fibronectin use in the diagnosis of preterm labor affect physician behavior and health care costs? A randomized trial

W. A. Grobman, E. E. Welshman, Elizabeth Calhoun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether a knowledge of fetal fibronectin results affects patient treatment and health care costs. Study design Women between 24 and 34 weeks of gestation with a singleton pregnancy and preterm uterine contractions were eligible for enrollment. Once informed consent was given, a fetal fibronectin specimen was obtained, and women were assigned randomly into 2 groups. In 1 group, results of the fetal fibronectin test were available; in the other group, results were not available. The use of inpatient and outpatient health care resources subsequent to enrollment was ascertained through the use of medical records, hospital billing data, and patient interviews. This study was powered to allow the detection in the fetal fibronectin group of a 20% reduction in total health care-related costs. Results The 2 groups were similar with respect to maternal age, parity, race, cervical examination at admission, and estimated gestational age at enrollment and at delivery. Women who did not have fetal fibronectin results available were no different than those women who did with respect to initial length of labor and delivery observation (median, 4 hours vs 3 hours), hospital admission (28% vs 26%), tocolysis (18% vs 16%), cessation of work (27% vs 26%), or total health care-related costs (log mean ± SD, 7.6 ± 1.2 vs 7.5 ± 1.1). Conclusion In this study population, the use of fetal fibronectin did not affect physician behavior or health care costs related to preterm contractions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-240
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume191
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2004
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Premature Obstetric Labor
Fibronectins
Health Care Costs
Physicians
Tocolysis
Uterine Contraction
Pregnancy
Health Resources
Maternal Age
Ambulatory Care
Parity
Informed Consent
Gestational Age
Medical Records
Inpatients
Patient Care
Observation
Interviews
Delivery of Health Care
Population

Keywords

  • Fetal fibronectin
  • Preterm contraction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Does fetal fibronectin use in the diagnosis of preterm labor affect physician behavior and health care costs? A randomized trial. / Grobman, W. A.; Welshman, E. E.; Calhoun, Elizabeth.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 191, No. 1, 07.2004, p. 235-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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