Does Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Subcutaneous Rapid-acting Insulin Reduce the Need for Intensive Care Unit Admission?

Brian G. Cohn, Samuel M Keim, Joseph W. Watkins, Carlos A. Camargo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background In the last 20 years, rapid-acting insulin analogs have emerged on the market, including aspart and lispro, which may be efficacious in the management of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) when administered by non-intravenous (i.v.) routes. Clinical Question In patients with mild-to-moderate DKA without another reason for intensive care unit (ICU) admission, is the administration of a subcutaneous (s.c.) rapid-acting insulin analog a safe and effective alternative to a continuous infusion of i.v. regular insulin, and would such a strategy eliminate the need for ICU admission? Evidence Review Five randomized controlled trials were identified and critically appraised. Results The outcomes suggest that there is no difference in the duration of therapy required to resolve DKA with either strategy. Conclusion Current evidence supports DKA management with s.c. rapid-acting insulin analogs in a non-ICU setting in carefully selected patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)530-538
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Emergency Medicine
Volume49
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Short-Acting Insulin
Diabetic Ketoacidosis
Intensive Care Units
Insulin Lispro
Intravenous Infusions
Randomized Controlled Trials
Insulin

Keywords

  • diabetic ketoacidosis
  • DKA
  • hospitalization
  • insulin
  • intensive care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Does Management of Diabetic Ketoacidosis with Subcutaneous Rapid-acting Insulin Reduce the Need for Intensive Care Unit Admission? / Cohn, Brian G.; Keim, Samuel M; Watkins, Joseph W.; Camargo, Carlos A.

In: Journal of Emergency Medicine, Vol. 49, No. 4, 01.10.2015, p. 530-538.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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