Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?

Carlos V R Brown, George Kasotakis, Alison Wilcox, Peter M Rhee, Ali Salim, Demetrios Demetriades

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirtyseven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)759-762
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Surgeon
Volume71
Issue number9
StatePublished - 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hematoma
Angiography
Tomography
Hemorrhage
Patient Admission
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Brown, C. V. R., Kasotakis, G., Wilcox, A., Rhee, P. M., Salim, A., & Demetriades, D. (2005). Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture? American Surgeon, 71(9), 759-762.

Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture? / Brown, Carlos V R; Kasotakis, George; Wilcox, Alison; Rhee, Peter M; Salim, Ali; Demetriades, Demetrios.

In: American Surgeon, Vol. 71, No. 9, 2005, p. 759-762.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brown, CVR, Kasotakis, G, Wilcox, A, Rhee, PM, Salim, A & Demetriades, D 2005, 'Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?', American Surgeon, vol. 71, no. 9, pp. 759-762.
Brown, Carlos V R ; Kasotakis, George ; Wilcox, Alison ; Rhee, Peter M ; Salim, Ali ; Demetriades, Demetrios. / Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?. In: American Surgeon. 2005 ; Vol. 71, No. 9. pp. 759-762.
@article{c1a89ecbbac1496b8a13d5bb43bea5ff,
title = "Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?",
abstract = "Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirtyseven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83{\%}) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83{\%}) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71{\%}) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.",
author = "Brown, {Carlos V R} and George Kasotakis and Alison Wilcox and Rhee, {Peter M} and Ali Salim and Demetrios Demetriades",
year = "2005",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "71",
pages = "759--762",
journal = "American Surgeon",
issn = "0003-1348",
publisher = "Southeastern Surgical Congress",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography predict active bleeding at angiography for pelvic fracture?

AU - Brown, Carlos V R

AU - Kasotakis, George

AU - Wilcox, Alison

AU - Rhee, Peter M

AU - Salim, Ali

AU - Demetriades, Demetrios

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirtyseven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

AB - Pelvic angiography plays an increasing role in the management of pelvic fractures (PFs). Little has been written regarding the size of pelvic hematoma on admission computed tomography (CT) and how it relates to angiography results after PF. This is a retrospective review of trauma patients with PF who underwent an admission abdominal/pelvic CT scan and pelvic angiography from 2001 to 2003. CT pelvic hematoma was measured and classified as minimal or significant based on hematoma dimensions. Presence of a contrast blush on CT scan was also documented. Thirtyseven patients underwent an admission CT scan and went on to pelvic angiography. Of the 22 patients with significant pelvic hematoma, 73 per cent (n = 16) had bleeding at angiography. Fifteen patients had minimal pelvic hematoma, with 67 per cent (n = 10) showing active bleeding at angiography. In addition, five of six patients (83%) with no pelvic hematoma had active bleeding at angiography. Six patients had a blush on CT scan, with five of these (83%) having a positive angiogram. But, 22 of 31 (71%) patients with no blush on CT scan had bleeding at angiography. The absence of a pelvic hematoma or contrast blush should not alter indications for pelvic angiography, as they do not reliably exclude active pelvic bleeding.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33644934352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33644934352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 759

EP - 762

JO - American Surgeon

JF - American Surgeon

SN - 0003-1348

IS - 9

ER -