Does sleep quality mediate the association between neighborhood disorder and self-rated physical health?

Lauren Hale, Terrence Hill, Amy M. Burdette

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: We examine the association between perceived neighborhood disorder and self-rated physical health. Building on previous research, we test whether this association is mediated by sleep quality. Methods: We use data from the 2004 Survey of Texas Adults (n= 1323) to estimate a series of ordinary least squares regression models. We formally assess mediation by testing for significant changes in the effect of neighborhood disorder before and after adjusting for sleep quality. Results: We find that residence in a neighborhood that is perceived as noisy, unclean, and crime-ridden is associated with poorer self-rated physical health, even with controls for irregular exercise, poor diet quality, smoking, binge drinking, obesity and a host of relevant sociodemographic factors. Our results also indicate that the relationship between neighborhood disorder and self-rated physical health is partially mediated by lower sleep quality. Conclusion: Targeted interventions designed to promote sleep quality in disadvantaged neighborhoods may help to improve the physical health of residents in the short-term. Policies aimed at solving the problem of neighborhood disorder are needed to support sleep quality and physical health in the long-term.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-278
Number of pages4
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume51
Issue number3-4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep
Health
Binge Drinking
Vulnerable Populations
Crime
Least-Squares Analysis
Obesity
Smoking
Exercise
Diet
Research

Keywords

  • Neighborhood
  • Physical health
  • Sleep

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Epidemiology

Cite this

Does sleep quality mediate the association between neighborhood disorder and self-rated physical health? / Hale, Lauren; Hill, Terrence; Burdette, Amy M.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 51, No. 3-4, 09.2010, p. 275-278.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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