Does television exposure influence college-aged women's sexual self-concept?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined whether television exposure shapes female emerging adults' sexual self-concept, defined as self-perceptions of one's qualities in the sexual domain. Results from two-year panel data collected from undergraduate women suggested that Time-1 exposure to soap operas, prime-time dramas, and amount of television viewing predicted a deflation in college women's Time-2 sexual self-concept. In addition, Time-1 sexual self-concept negatively predicted Time-2 prime-time drama exposure and Time-2 television watched per day. The results are interpreted in light of the cognitive information processing model (Huesmann, 1997) and the selective exposure hypothesis (Festinger, 1957).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-181
Number of pages25
JournalMedia Psychology
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Television
self-concept
Self Concept
television
prime time
Soaps (detergents)
Drama
drama
soap opera
deflation
information processing
self-image
Soaps
time
Automatic Data Processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Does television exposure influence college-aged women's sexual self-concept? / Stevens Aubrey, Jennifer L.

In: Media Psychology, Vol. 10, No. 2, 2007, p. 157-181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{a7246de241da4ce1b82f4206e7c6a579,
title = "Does television exposure influence college-aged women's sexual self-concept?",
abstract = "The present study examined whether television exposure shapes female emerging adults' sexual self-concept, defined as self-perceptions of one's qualities in the sexual domain. Results from two-year panel data collected from undergraduate women suggested that Time-1 exposure to soap operas, prime-time dramas, and amount of television viewing predicted a deflation in college women's Time-2 sexual self-concept. In addition, Time-1 sexual self-concept negatively predicted Time-2 prime-time drama exposure and Time-2 television watched per day. The results are interpreted in light of the cognitive information processing model (Huesmann, 1997) and the selective exposure hypothesis (Festinger, 1957).",
author = "{Stevens Aubrey}, {Jennifer L}",
year = "2007",
doi = "10.1080/15213260701375561",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "157--181",
journal = "Media Psychology",
issn = "1521-3269",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does television exposure influence college-aged women's sexual self-concept?

AU - Stevens Aubrey, Jennifer L

PY - 2007

Y1 - 2007

N2 - The present study examined whether television exposure shapes female emerging adults' sexual self-concept, defined as self-perceptions of one's qualities in the sexual domain. Results from two-year panel data collected from undergraduate women suggested that Time-1 exposure to soap operas, prime-time dramas, and amount of television viewing predicted a deflation in college women's Time-2 sexual self-concept. In addition, Time-1 sexual self-concept negatively predicted Time-2 prime-time drama exposure and Time-2 television watched per day. The results are interpreted in light of the cognitive information processing model (Huesmann, 1997) and the selective exposure hypothesis (Festinger, 1957).

AB - The present study examined whether television exposure shapes female emerging adults' sexual self-concept, defined as self-perceptions of one's qualities in the sexual domain. Results from two-year panel data collected from undergraduate women suggested that Time-1 exposure to soap operas, prime-time dramas, and amount of television viewing predicted a deflation in college women's Time-2 sexual self-concept. In addition, Time-1 sexual self-concept negatively predicted Time-2 prime-time drama exposure and Time-2 television watched per day. The results are interpreted in light of the cognitive information processing model (Huesmann, 1997) and the selective exposure hypothesis (Festinger, 1957).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34547552761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34547552761&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/15213260701375561

DO - 10.1080/15213260701375561

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:34547552761

VL - 10

SP - 157

EP - 181

JO - Media Psychology

JF - Media Psychology

SN - 1521-3269

IS - 2

ER -