Does volume of patients seen in an outpatient setting impact test scores?

Leigh A Neumayer, Rose Marie McNamara, Merril Dayton, Benjamin Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Methods of teaching surgery in the outpatient setting and means to measure the effectiveness of these methods have not been defined. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of number of outpatient encounters on test scores for third-year medical students. METHODS: Students rotating on the required third-year surgery clerkship between July 1994 and June 1996 kept a log of their activities including number of patients seen in clinic, number of cases scrubbed, and pages read. At the end of the rotation the students were given an essay examination and a multiple-choice examination. The data were analyzed looking for correlation between examination scores and volume of patients seen. United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores were used as a baseline measure to compare the rotation groups. RESULTS: USMLE scores did not differ between groups. Mean essay examination scores varied significantly between some rotation groups, but did not follow a pattern. There was no correlation between the number of patients seen in clinic and essay examination scores. There was a significant correlation between essay score and USMLE Step 1 score (Pearson's r = 0.398) and between essay and multiple-choice examination scores (Pearson's r = 0.313). There was a significant negative correlation between number of patients seen in clinic and number of cases scrubbed (Pearson's r = -0.347). CONCLUSIONS: Participation in outpatient surgery clinics did not result in improved performance on written examinations in this surgery clerkship. To achieve the most benefit from the outpatient clinic, objectives of the experience need to be determined and appropriate tools used to measure their successful achievement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)511-514
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgery
Volume175
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Outpatients
Licensure
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Students
Medical Students
Teaching

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Does volume of patients seen in an outpatient setting impact test scores? / Neumayer, Leigh A; McNamara, Rose Marie; Dayton, Merril; Kim, Benjamin.

In: American Journal of Surgery, Vol. 175, No. 6, 06.1998, p. 511-514.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Neumayer, Leigh A ; McNamara, Rose Marie ; Dayton, Merril ; Kim, Benjamin. / Does volume of patients seen in an outpatient setting impact test scores?. In: American Journal of Surgery. 1998 ; Vol. 175, No. 6. pp. 511-514.
@article{e947673cb49b4ff5a41bd243fd9d31d6,
title = "Does volume of patients seen in an outpatient setting impact test scores?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Methods of teaching surgery in the outpatient setting and means to measure the effectiveness of these methods have not been defined. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of number of outpatient encounters on test scores for third-year medical students. METHODS: Students rotating on the required third-year surgery clerkship between July 1994 and June 1996 kept a log of their activities including number of patients seen in clinic, number of cases scrubbed, and pages read. At the end of the rotation the students were given an essay examination and a multiple-choice examination. The data were analyzed looking for correlation between examination scores and volume of patients seen. United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores were used as a baseline measure to compare the rotation groups. RESULTS: USMLE scores did not differ between groups. Mean essay examination scores varied significantly between some rotation groups, but did not follow a pattern. There was no correlation between the number of patients seen in clinic and essay examination scores. There was a significant correlation between essay score and USMLE Step 1 score (Pearson's r = 0.398) and between essay and multiple-choice examination scores (Pearson's r = 0.313). There was a significant negative correlation between number of patients seen in clinic and number of cases scrubbed (Pearson's r = -0.347). CONCLUSIONS: Participation in outpatient surgery clinics did not result in improved performance on written examinations in this surgery clerkship. To achieve the most benefit from the outpatient clinic, objectives of the experience need to be determined and appropriate tools used to measure their successful achievement.",
author = "Neumayer, {Leigh A} and McNamara, {Rose Marie} and Merril Dayton and Benjamin Kim",
year = "1998",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1016/S0002-9610(98)00086-5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "175",
pages = "511--514",
journal = "American Journal of Surgery",
issn = "0002-9610",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does volume of patients seen in an outpatient setting impact test scores?

AU - Neumayer, Leigh A

AU - McNamara, Rose Marie

AU - Dayton, Merril

AU - Kim, Benjamin

PY - 1998/6

Y1 - 1998/6

N2 - BACKGROUND: Methods of teaching surgery in the outpatient setting and means to measure the effectiveness of these methods have not been defined. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of number of outpatient encounters on test scores for third-year medical students. METHODS: Students rotating on the required third-year surgery clerkship between July 1994 and June 1996 kept a log of their activities including number of patients seen in clinic, number of cases scrubbed, and pages read. At the end of the rotation the students were given an essay examination and a multiple-choice examination. The data were analyzed looking for correlation between examination scores and volume of patients seen. United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores were used as a baseline measure to compare the rotation groups. RESULTS: USMLE scores did not differ between groups. Mean essay examination scores varied significantly between some rotation groups, but did not follow a pattern. There was no correlation between the number of patients seen in clinic and essay examination scores. There was a significant correlation between essay score and USMLE Step 1 score (Pearson's r = 0.398) and between essay and multiple-choice examination scores (Pearson's r = 0.313). There was a significant negative correlation between number of patients seen in clinic and number of cases scrubbed (Pearson's r = -0.347). CONCLUSIONS: Participation in outpatient surgery clinics did not result in improved performance on written examinations in this surgery clerkship. To achieve the most benefit from the outpatient clinic, objectives of the experience need to be determined and appropriate tools used to measure their successful achievement.

AB - BACKGROUND: Methods of teaching surgery in the outpatient setting and means to measure the effectiveness of these methods have not been defined. This study was designed to evaluate the impact of number of outpatient encounters on test scores for third-year medical students. METHODS: Students rotating on the required third-year surgery clerkship between July 1994 and June 1996 kept a log of their activities including number of patients seen in clinic, number of cases scrubbed, and pages read. At the end of the rotation the students were given an essay examination and a multiple-choice examination. The data were analyzed looking for correlation between examination scores and volume of patients seen. United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) Step 1 scores were used as a baseline measure to compare the rotation groups. RESULTS: USMLE scores did not differ between groups. Mean essay examination scores varied significantly between some rotation groups, but did not follow a pattern. There was no correlation between the number of patients seen in clinic and essay examination scores. There was a significant correlation between essay score and USMLE Step 1 score (Pearson's r = 0.398) and between essay and multiple-choice examination scores (Pearson's r = 0.313). There was a significant negative correlation between number of patients seen in clinic and number of cases scrubbed (Pearson's r = -0.347). CONCLUSIONS: Participation in outpatient surgery clinics did not result in improved performance on written examinations in this surgery clerkship. To achieve the most benefit from the outpatient clinic, objectives of the experience need to be determined and appropriate tools used to measure their successful achievement.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032101679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032101679&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/S0002-9610(98)00086-5

DO - 10.1016/S0002-9610(98)00086-5

M3 - Article

VL - 175

SP - 511

EP - 514

JO - American Journal of Surgery

JF - American Journal of Surgery

SN - 0002-9610

IS - 6

ER -