"Don't call me a student-athlete": The effect of identity priming on stereotype threat for academically engaged African American college athletes

Jeff Stone, C. Keith Harrison, Ja Vonte Mottley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Academically engaged African American college athletes are most susceptible to stereotype threat in the classroom when the context links their unique status as both scholar and athlete. After completing a measure of academic engagement, African American and White college athletes completed a test of verbal reasoning. To vary stereotype threat, they first indicated their status as a scholar-athlete, an athlete, or as a research participant on the cover page. Compared to the other groups, academically engaged African American college athletes performed poorly on the difficult test items when primed for their athletic identity, but they performed worse on both the difficult and easy test items when primed for their identity as a scholar-athlete. The unique stereotype threat processes that affect the academic performance of minority college athletes are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-106
Number of pages8
JournalBasic and Applied Social Psychology
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2012

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

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