Dual-sensor foveated imaging system

Hong Hua, Sheng Liu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conventional imaging techniques adopt a rectilinear sampling approach, where a finite number of pixels are spread evenly across an entire field of view (FOV). Consequently, their imaging capabilities are limited by an inherent trade-off between the FOV and the resolving power. In contrast, a foveation technique allocates the limited resources (e.g., a finite number of pixels or transmission bandwidth) as a function of foveal eccentricities, which can significantly simplify the optical and electronic designs and reduce the data throughput, while the observer's ability to see fine details is maintained over the whole FOV. We explore an approach to a foveated imaging system design. Our approach approximates the spatially variant properties (i.e., resolution, contrast, and color sensitivities) of the human visual system with multiple low-cost off-the-shelf imaging sensors and maximizes the information throughput and bandwidth savings of the foveated system. We further validate our approach with the design of a compact dual-sensor foveated imaging system. A proof-of-concept bench prototype and experimental results are demonstrated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)317-327
Number of pages11
JournalApplied Optics
Volume47
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 20 2008

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Imaging systems
field of view
Imaging techniques
sensors
Sensors
Pixels
pixels
Throughput
bandwidth
Bandwidth
Optical resolving power
shelves
eccentricity
imaging techniques
systems engineering
seats
resources
Systems analysis
sampling
prototypes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics

Cite this

Dual-sensor foveated imaging system. / Hua, Hong; Liu, Sheng.

In: Applied Optics, Vol. 47, No. 3, 20.01.2008, p. 317-327.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hua, Hong ; Liu, Sheng. / Dual-sensor foveated imaging system. In: Applied Optics. 2008 ; Vol. 47, No. 3. pp. 317-327.
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