DYSFUNCTION OF THE MICROCIRCULATION DURING MYOCARDIAL PRESERVATION - CONTRACTILE CONSEQUENCES.

Janis M Burt, L. Manciet

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Abstract

We are investigating the role of the microcirculation in the loss of contractile function of hearts subjected to long-term preservation procedures. Following 24 hours of continuous perfusion at low pressure (13 mmHg) and temperature (5 degree C) with a crystalloid cardioplegic solution, rabbit hearts exhibited a 25% reduction in both left ventricular compliance and contractility. We hypothesize that these alterations of contractile function reflect dysfunction of the microcirculation. Experimental results suggest that by as early as 1-2 hours of preservation, significant areas of ischemia exist. The progressive alterations of contractile function could be a result of the prolonged period of ischemia. To determine whether this apparent 'no-flow' injury is exacerbated or reversed by reperfusion, preserved hearts were reperfused prior to infusion of the ink. Many of the reperfused hearts no longer exhibited large areas of no-flow suggesting that the no-flow phenomenon present during the preservation period is, at least in part, reversible.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109
Number of pages1
JournalAnnals of Biomedical Engineering
Volume15
Issue number1
StatePublished - 1987

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Microcirculation
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

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DYSFUNCTION OF THE MICROCIRCULATION DURING MYOCARDIAL PRESERVATION - CONTRACTILE CONSEQUENCES. / Burt, Janis M; Manciet, L.

In: Annals of Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 15, No. 1, 1987, p. 109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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