EAP hydrogels for pulse-actuated cell system (PACS) architectures

R. Erik Plata, Hallena R. Rogers, Mark Banister, Sonia Vohnout, Dominic V. McGrath

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Electroactuated polymer (EAP) hydrogels based on JEFFAMINE® T-403 and ethylene glycol glycidyl ether (EGDGE) are used in an infusion pump based on the proprietary Pulse Actuated Cell System (PACS) architecture in development at Medipacs LLC. We report here significant progress in optimizing the formulation of the EAP hydrogels to dramatically increase hydrolytic stability and reproducibility of actuation response. By adjusting the mole fraction of reactive components of the formulation and substituting higher molecular weight monomers, we eliminated a large degree of the hydrolytic instability of the hydrogels, decreased the brittleness of the gel, and increased the equilibrium swelling ratio. The combination of these two modifications to the formulation resulted in hydrogels that exhibited reproducible swelling and deswelling in response to pH for a total period of 10-15 hours.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationElectroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2007
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 15 2007
EventElectroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2007 - San Diego, CA, United States
Duration: Mar 19 2007Mar 22 2007

Publication series

NameProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume6524
ISSN (Print)0277-786X

Other

OtherElectroactive Polymer Actuators and Devices (EAPAD) 2007
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CitySan Diego, CA
Period3/19/073/22/07

Keywords

  • Drug delivery
  • Electroactuated polymer
  • Hydrogels
  • Infusion pump

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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