Earliest isotopic evidence in the Maya region for animal management and long-distance trade at the site of Ceibal, Guatemala

Ashley E. Sharpe, Kitty F. Emery, Takeshi Inomata, Daniela Triadan, George D. Kamenov, John Krigbaum

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study uses a multiisotope (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, and strontium) approach to examine early animal management in the Maya region. An analysis of faunal specimens across almost 2,000 years (1000 BC to AD 950) at the site of Ceibal, Guatemala, reveals the earliest evidence for live-traded dogs and possible captive-reared taxa in the Americas. These animals may have been procured for ceremonial functions based on their location in the monumental site core, suggesting that animal management and trade began in the Maya area to promote special events, activities that were critical in the development of state society. Isotopic evidence for animal captivity at Ceibal reveals that animal management played a greater role in Maya communities than previously believed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3605-3610
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume115
Issue number14
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2018

Keywords

  • Isotope analysis
  • Maya archaeology
  • Zooarchaeology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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