Early diagnosis of stress-induced apical ballooning syndrome based on classic echocardiographic findings and correlation with cardiac catheterization

Daniel Donohue, Chowdhury Ahsan, Mohammad Sanaei-Ardekani, Mohammad Reza Movahed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Scopus citations

Abstract

Stress-induced apical ballooning has been described as a reversible condition involving the apical left ventricular wall, sparing the base, and causing a ballooning appearance of the left ventricle during systole despite normal coronaries. We are presenting 4 cases of apical ballooning seen at our institution with echocardiographic correlation. Echocardiography showed similar anatomical apical ballooning of the left ventricular apex. The diagnosis of apical ballooning syndrome was suspected based on echocardiography in conjunction with clinical data before cardiac catheterization was performed. In one case, in addition to classic left ventricular apical ballooning, marked right ventricular apical akinesia was present on the initial echocardiographic examination. This makes diagnosis of apical ballooning syndrome most likely in this patient before cardiac catheterization. Therefore, we suggest using echocardiography more often for the early diagnosis of this disease, based on careful anatomic evaluation in conjunction with clinical data. Wall motion analysis should reveal an apical ballooning appearance involving many coronary territories. Furthermore, the additional presence of right ventricular apical akinesia during echocardiographic examination makes the diagnosis of this syndrome more likely.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1423.e1-1423.e8
JournalJournal of the American Society of Echocardiography
Volume18
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2005
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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