Earthen embankment breaching

The ASCE/EWRI Task Committee on Dam/Levee Breaching (Break Fluvial Processes)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

95 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Embankment breaching processes are very complex and involve mixed-regime free-surface flow with overfalls and hydraulic jumps, pressurized pipe flow, strong vertical and lateral erosion, discrete mass failure, and headcut migration. The failure mode and mechanism are affected by upstream and downstream water conditions, embankment configurations, and soil properties and state. Great progress has been made to investigate embankment breaching processes through laboratory and field experiments and real-world case studies. However, most laboratory experiments were for smallscale homogeneous embankments, only a few outdoor experiments were conducted at large scales (up to several meters in height) and/or were of composite construction, and only limited data sets for historical embankment failures were sufficiently documented. A number of parametric, simplified physically-based, and detailed multidimensional physically-based embankment breach models have been established in the past decades, but prediction with these models involves significant uncertainties. The biggest limitation of the existing breach models is quantifying erosion rates or erodibility of cohesive soils and sediment entrainment under embankment break/breaching flows. It is important to conduct more large-scale laboratory experiments and field case studies to improve existing embankment breach models or develop new ones. These models should also be enhanced by incorporating better physical insights, by using more efficient computational technologies, and integrating them into more robust flood forecasting and risk assessment systems with comprehensive relevant databases

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1549-1564
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Hydraulic Engineering
Volume137
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 13 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Embankments
embankment
Erosion
Experiments
Hydraulic jump
Soils
free surface flow
cohesive sediment
pipe flow
cohesive soil
flood forecasting
erodibility
Pipe flow
erosion rate
entrainment
Risk assessment
Failure modes
soil property
Sediments
risk assessment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

The ASCE/EWRI Task Committee on Dam/Levee Breaching (Break Fluvial Processes) (2011). Earthen embankment breaching. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, 137(12), 1549-1564. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0000498

Earthen embankment breaching. / The ASCE/EWRI Task Committee on Dam/Levee Breaching (Break Fluvial Processes).

In: Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, Vol. 137, No. 12, 13.12.2011, p. 1549-1564.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

The ASCE/EWRI Task Committee on Dam/Levee Breaching (Break Fluvial Processes) 2011, 'Earthen embankment breaching', Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, vol. 137, no. 12, pp. 1549-1564. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0000498
The ASCE/EWRI Task Committee on Dam/Levee Breaching (Break Fluvial Processes). Earthen embankment breaching. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering. 2011 Dec 13;137(12):1549-1564. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)HY.1943-7900.0000498
The ASCE/EWRI Task Committee on Dam/Levee Breaching (Break Fluvial Processes). / Earthen embankment breaching. In: Journal of Hydraulic Engineering. 2011 ; Vol. 137, No. 12. pp. 1549-1564.
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