Ebola’s Would-be Refugees: Performing Fear and Navigating Asylum During a Public Health Emergency

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Chronic and acute illnesses sit uncomfortably with asylum claiming and refugee mobilities. The story of a Sierra Leonean, an athlete who feared Ebola and sought refuge in the UK, provides an opening to examine protection discourses that invoke fear, trauma, and crisis metaphors, to understand how asylum claims are performed, and how related petitions are adjudicated during public health emergencies of international concern. Ebola is revealed as a novel claim strategy, and thus a useful subject matter to investigate the shifting modalities of migrant agency, the unstable fabric of medical humanitarianism, and knowledge production in moments of exceptionality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-532
Number of pages19
JournalMedical Anthropology: Cross Cultural Studies in Health and Illness
Volume37
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 18 2018

Keywords

  • Ebola
  • public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC)
  • refugees/asylum
  • Sierra Leone
  • trauma
  • United Kingdom

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Anthropology

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