Ecological impacts on the limpet Lottia gigantea populations

Human pressure over a broad scale on island and mainland intertidal zones

Raphael D Sagarin, Richard F. Ambrose, Bonnie J. Becker, John M. Engle, Janine Kido, Steven F. Lee, C. Melissa Miner, Steven N. Murray, Peter T. Raimondi, Dan Richards, Christy Roe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Here long-term monitoring data taken at 33 sites in southern and central California coast and islands were used to evaluate the size structure of the large intertidal limpet, Lottia gigantea in restricted-access and in easily accessible intertidal zones that encompass a wide range of ecological variables. Using multi-dimensional analysis of population size structures, we found that sites on islands and strictly protected mainland sites have significantly larger median limpet sizes and a greater range of limpet sizes than unprotected mainland sites, while no pattern occurs in latitudinal or regional comparison of sites. Although intertidal predators such as oystercatchers were not the primary focus of the monitoring efforts, extensive natural history notes taken during sampling visits support the argument that predation was not a primary cause for the size structure differences. Finally, substratum differences were determined not to have biased the observation of larger limpets in protected sites. In regard to human interactions with limpets, we conclude that the degree of enforcement against poaching is the better predictor of limpet size structure than proximity to population centers or visitation to intertidal sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)399-413
Number of pages15
JournalMarine Biology
Volume150
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2007
Externally publishedYes

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littoral zone
ecological impact
size structure
intertidal environment
human population
poaching
population size
monitoring
predation
predator
natural history
limpets
coast
sampling
history
predators
coasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Ecological impacts on the limpet Lottia gigantea populations : Human pressure over a broad scale on island and mainland intertidal zones. / Sagarin, Raphael D; Ambrose, Richard F.; Becker, Bonnie J.; Engle, John M.; Kido, Janine; Lee, Steven F.; Miner, C. Melissa; Murray, Steven N.; Raimondi, Peter T.; Richards, Dan; Roe, Christy.

In: Marine Biology, Vol. 150, No. 3, 01.2007, p. 399-413.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sagarin, RD, Ambrose, RF, Becker, BJ, Engle, JM, Kido, J, Lee, SF, Miner, CM, Murray, SN, Raimondi, PT, Richards, D & Roe, C 2007, 'Ecological impacts on the limpet Lottia gigantea populations: Human pressure over a broad scale on island and mainland intertidal zones', Marine Biology, vol. 150, no. 3, pp. 399-413. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00227-006-0341-1
Sagarin, Raphael D ; Ambrose, Richard F. ; Becker, Bonnie J. ; Engle, John M. ; Kido, Janine ; Lee, Steven F. ; Miner, C. Melissa ; Murray, Steven N. ; Raimondi, Peter T. ; Richards, Dan ; Roe, Christy. / Ecological impacts on the limpet Lottia gigantea populations : Human pressure over a broad scale on island and mainland intertidal zones. In: Marine Biology. 2007 ; Vol. 150, No. 3. pp. 399-413.
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