Economic burden of revision hip and knee arthroplasty in medicare enrollees

K. L. Ong, F. S. Mowat, N. Chan, E. Lau, Michael Halpern, S. M. Kurtz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

145 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The economic burden to Medicare due to revision arthroplasty procedures has not yet been studied systematically. The economic burden of revisions was calculated as annual reimbursements for revision arthroplasties relative to the sum total reimbursements of primary and revision arthroplasties. We evaluated this revision burden for total hip and knee arthroplasties through investigation of trends in charges and reimbursements in the Medicare population (Parts A and B claims from 1997-2003), while taking into account age and gender effects. Mean annual economic revision burdens were 18.8% (range, 17.4-20.2%) and 8.2% (range, 7.5-9.2%) for total hip arthroplasties and total knee arthroplasties, respectively. Procedural charges increased while reimbursements decreased over the study period, with higher charges observed for revisions than primary arthroplasties. Reimbursements per procedure were 62% to 68% less than associated charges for primary and revision total hip and knee arthroplasties. The effect of age and gender on reimbursements varied by procedure type. Unless some limiting mechanism is implemented to reduce the incidence of revision surgeries, the diverging trends in reimbursements and charges for total hip and knee arthroplasties indicate that the economic impact to the Medicare population and healthcare system will continue to increase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-28
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Issue number446
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Medicare
Arthroplasty
Hip
Economics
Reoperation
Population
Delivery of Health Care
Incidence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Economic burden of revision hip and knee arthroplasty in medicare enrollees. / Ong, K. L.; Mowat, F. S.; Chan, N.; Lau, E.; Halpern, Michael; Kurtz, S. M.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, No. 446, 05.2006, p. 22-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ong, K. L. ; Mowat, F. S. ; Chan, N. ; Lau, E. ; Halpern, Michael ; Kurtz, S. M. / Economic burden of revision hip and knee arthroplasty in medicare enrollees. In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research. 2006 ; No. 446. pp. 22-28.
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