EDCs in wastewater

What's the next step?

Caroline Scruggs, Gary Hunter, Erin Snyder, Bruce Long, Shane A Snyder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC), which are used in wastewater treatment, due to their seemingly endless number of uses and origins in domestic, industrial, and agricultural applications, are discussed. EDCs are substances derived from both anthropogenic and natural sources that change the function of the endocrine system, affecting the way an organism or its progeny reproduce, grow, or develop. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) currently regulates a number of possible EDCs, such as chlordane, DDT, dioxin, cadmium, lead, and mercury. There is no clear indication of adverse human response to trace levels of EDCs in drinking water.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)24-31
Number of pages8
JournalWater Environment and Technology
Volume17
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

agricultural application
endocrine system
chlordane
Mercury (metal)
Environmental Protection Agency
DDT
Potable water
Wastewater treatment
Cadmium
dioxin
Agriculture
Industrial applications
Wastewater
cadmium
Lead
drinking water
wastewater
wastewater treatment
organism
environmental protection agency

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Water Science and Technology
  • Pollution
  • Environmental Engineering

Cite this

Scruggs, C., Hunter, G., Snyder, E., Long, B., & Snyder, S. A. (2005). EDCs in wastewater: What's the next step? Water Environment and Technology, 17(3), 24-31.

EDCs in wastewater : What's the next step? / Scruggs, Caroline; Hunter, Gary; Snyder, Erin; Long, Bruce; Snyder, Shane A.

In: Water Environment and Technology, Vol. 17, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 24-31.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scruggs, C, Hunter, G, Snyder, E, Long, B & Snyder, SA 2005, 'EDCs in wastewater: What's the next step?', Water Environment and Technology, vol. 17, no. 3, pp. 24-31.
Scruggs C, Hunter G, Snyder E, Long B, Snyder SA. EDCs in wastewater: What's the next step? Water Environment and Technology. 2005 Mar;17(3):24-31.
Scruggs, Caroline ; Hunter, Gary ; Snyder, Erin ; Long, Bruce ; Snyder, Shane A. / EDCs in wastewater : What's the next step?. In: Water Environment and Technology. 2005 ; Vol. 17, No. 3. pp. 24-31.
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