Educational Technologies for Precollege Engineering Education

Mario Riojas, Susan Lysecky, Jerzy W Rozenblit

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Numerous efforts seek to increase awareness, interest, and participation in scientific and technological fields at the precollege level. Studies have shown these students are at a critical age where exposure to engineering and other related fields such as science, mathematics, and technology greatly impact their career goals. A variety of advanced learning technologies have emerged to enhance learning, promote hands-on experiences, and increase interest in engineering. However, creating and sustaining technology-infused learning environments at the precollege level is a challenging task, as many schools have limited resources and expertise. Moreover, while numerous technology solutions are available to support ambitious engineering-learning goals, choosing the right technology to align to program goals and resources may be a daunting task. In this work, we fill the gap between the applicability of educational implements and suitable teaching methods for precollege engineering. We present an overview of available hardware-and software-based technologies, and characterize these technologies based on criteria such as median price, the type of learning activities fostered, and the required users' expertise levels. In addition, we outline how these technologies align with deductive and inductive teaching methods that emphasize direct-instruction, inquiry-, problem-, and project-based methods, as studies have shown these methods are effective for precollege engineering education.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-37
Number of pages18
JournalIEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Educational technology
Engineering education
educational technology
engineering
education
teaching method
learning
Teaching
expertise
resources
hardware
learning environment
career
mathematics
Students
instruction
Hardware
participation

Keywords

  • Educational technologies
  • engineering education
  • human-centered computing
  • interactive environments
  • learning technologies
  • robotics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Engineering(all)
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Educational Technologies for Precollege Engineering Education. / Riojas, Mario; Lysecky, Susan; Rozenblit, Jerzy W.

In: IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, Vol. 5, No. 1, 2012, p. 20-37.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1b87270bfd98442aac6f9e2aea34f09e,
title = "Educational Technologies for Precollege Engineering Education",
abstract = "Numerous efforts seek to increase awareness, interest, and participation in scientific and technological fields at the precollege level. Studies have shown these students are at a critical age where exposure to engineering and other related fields such as science, mathematics, and technology greatly impact their career goals. A variety of advanced learning technologies have emerged to enhance learning, promote hands-on experiences, and increase interest in engineering. However, creating and sustaining technology-infused learning environments at the precollege level is a challenging task, as many schools have limited resources and expertise. Moreover, while numerous technology solutions are available to support ambitious engineering-learning goals, choosing the right technology to align to program goals and resources may be a daunting task. In this work, we fill the gap between the applicability of educational implements and suitable teaching methods for precollege engineering. We present an overview of available hardware-and software-based technologies, and characterize these technologies based on criteria such as median price, the type of learning activities fostered, and the required users' expertise levels. In addition, we outline how these technologies align with deductive and inductive teaching methods that emphasize direct-instruction, inquiry-, problem-, and project-based methods, as studies have shown these methods are effective for precollege engineering education.",
keywords = "Educational technologies, engineering education, human-centered computing, interactive environments, learning technologies, robotics",
author = "Mario Riojas and Susan Lysecky and Rozenblit, {Jerzy W}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1109/TLT.2011.16",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "20--37",
journal = "IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies",
issn = "1939-1382",
publisher = "Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Educational Technologies for Precollege Engineering Education

AU - Riojas, Mario

AU - Lysecky, Susan

AU - Rozenblit, Jerzy W

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Numerous efforts seek to increase awareness, interest, and participation in scientific and technological fields at the precollege level. Studies have shown these students are at a critical age where exposure to engineering and other related fields such as science, mathematics, and technology greatly impact their career goals. A variety of advanced learning technologies have emerged to enhance learning, promote hands-on experiences, and increase interest in engineering. However, creating and sustaining technology-infused learning environments at the precollege level is a challenging task, as many schools have limited resources and expertise. Moreover, while numerous technology solutions are available to support ambitious engineering-learning goals, choosing the right technology to align to program goals and resources may be a daunting task. In this work, we fill the gap between the applicability of educational implements and suitable teaching methods for precollege engineering. We present an overview of available hardware-and software-based technologies, and characterize these technologies based on criteria such as median price, the type of learning activities fostered, and the required users' expertise levels. In addition, we outline how these technologies align with deductive and inductive teaching methods that emphasize direct-instruction, inquiry-, problem-, and project-based methods, as studies have shown these methods are effective for precollege engineering education.

AB - Numerous efforts seek to increase awareness, interest, and participation in scientific and technological fields at the precollege level. Studies have shown these students are at a critical age where exposure to engineering and other related fields such as science, mathematics, and technology greatly impact their career goals. A variety of advanced learning technologies have emerged to enhance learning, promote hands-on experiences, and increase interest in engineering. However, creating and sustaining technology-infused learning environments at the precollege level is a challenging task, as many schools have limited resources and expertise. Moreover, while numerous technology solutions are available to support ambitious engineering-learning goals, choosing the right technology to align to program goals and resources may be a daunting task. In this work, we fill the gap between the applicability of educational implements and suitable teaching methods for precollege engineering. We present an overview of available hardware-and software-based technologies, and characterize these technologies based on criteria such as median price, the type of learning activities fostered, and the required users' expertise levels. In addition, we outline how these technologies align with deductive and inductive teaching methods that emphasize direct-instruction, inquiry-, problem-, and project-based methods, as studies have shown these methods are effective for precollege engineering education.

KW - Educational technologies

KW - engineering education

KW - human-centered computing

KW - interactive environments

KW - learning technologies

KW - robotics

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85008525571&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85008525571&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/TLT.2011.16

DO - 10.1109/TLT.2011.16

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85008525571

VL - 5

SP - 20

EP - 37

JO - IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies

JF - IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies

SN - 1939-1382

IS - 1

ER -