Effect of acculturation and income on hispanic women's health

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This research examines how acculturation and income affect health care access, utilization, and prevention knowledge among a population of Hispanic women living along the U.S.-Mexico border in Yuma, Arizona, a rural agricultural county. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 417 Hispanic women with mean age 61.3 years (s.d.=9.2). Most were long-term residents of Yuma County with some elementary and middle school education. Respondents had low monthly household incomes (average: $927.77, s.d.=550.40) and 10% reported current employment. The results show that income may be a more important predictor of actual utilization of health care services while acculturation may play a more prominent role with respect to provider preferences. A better understanding of the complex interplay between the individual and the society she inhabits is required in order to develop a meaningful public health intervention that will affect disease risk.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)128-141
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Volume16
Issue number4 SUPPL. A
StatePublished - Nov 2005

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Women's Health
acculturation
Hispanic Americans
utilization
income
school education
health care services
household income
health
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
elementary school
low income
Mexico
public health
health care
resident
Disease
Health Services
Public Health

Keywords

  • Acculturation
  • Hispanic
  • Income
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Effect of acculturation and income on hispanic women's health. / Nuno, Velia Leybas; Nuño, Thomas; Garcia, Francisco A.

In: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved, Vol. 16, No. 4 SUPPL. A, 11.2005, p. 128-141.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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