Effect of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) on treadmill walking time among adults with peripheral artery disease: A randomized clinical trial

Christopher D. Gardner, Ruth E Taylor-Piliae, Alexandre Kiazand, Joel Nicholus, Alison J. Rigby, John W. Farquhar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

■ PURPOSE: Medical therapies for treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) are limited. Ginkgo biloba has been reported to increase maximal and pain-free walking distance among patients with PAD; however, the evidence is inconsistent. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of 300 mg/d of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) versus placebo on treadmill walking time and related cardiovascular measures among patients with PAD. ■ METHODS: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial with a 4-month duration was used. Participants were 62 adults, aged 70 ± 8 years (mean ± SD), with claudication symptoms of PAD. The primary study outcomes were maximal and pain-free walking time on a treadmill. Secondary outcomes included flow-mediated vasodilation, a measure of antioxidant status as assessed by determining antibody levels to epitopes of oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and questionnaires addressing walking impairment and quality of life. ■ RESULTS: Maximal treadmill walking time increased by 20 ± 80 and 91 ± 242 seconds in the placebo and the EGb 761 groups, respectively (P = .12). Pain-free walking time increased by 15 ± 31 and 21 ± 43 seconds, respectively (P = .28). No significant differences were detected between groups for any of the secondary outcomes. ■ CONCLUSIONS: In older adults with PAD, Ginkgo biloba produced a modest but insignificant increase in maximal treadmill walking time and flow-mediated vasodilation. These data do not support the use of Ginkgo biloba as an effective therapy for PAD, although a longer duration of use should be considered in any future trials.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)258-265
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ginkgo biloba
Peripheral Arterial Disease
Walking
Randomized Controlled Trials
Placebos
Vasodilation
Ginkgo biloba extract 761
Epitopes
Therapeutics
Antioxidants
Quality of Life
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Antibodies

Keywords

  • Claudication
  • Ginkgo biloba
  • Peripheral artery disease
  • Treadmill time

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Effect of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) on treadmill walking time among adults with peripheral artery disease : A randomized clinical trial. / Gardner, Christopher D.; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E; Kiazand, Alexandre; Nicholus, Joel; Rigby, Alison J.; Farquhar, John W.

In: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention, Vol. 28, No. 4, 07.2008, p. 258-265.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gardner, Christopher D. ; Taylor-Piliae, Ruth E ; Kiazand, Alexandre ; Nicholus, Joel ; Rigby, Alison J. ; Farquhar, John W. / Effect of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) on treadmill walking time among adults with peripheral artery disease : A randomized clinical trial. In: Journal of Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation and Prevention. 2008 ; Vol. 28, No. 4. pp. 258-265.
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N2 - ■ PURPOSE: Medical therapies for treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) are limited. Ginkgo biloba has been reported to increase maximal and pain-free walking distance among patients with PAD; however, the evidence is inconsistent. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of 300 mg/d of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) versus placebo on treadmill walking time and related cardiovascular measures among patients with PAD. ■ METHODS: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial with a 4-month duration was used. Participants were 62 adults, aged 70 ± 8 years (mean ± SD), with claudication symptoms of PAD. The primary study outcomes were maximal and pain-free walking time on a treadmill. Secondary outcomes included flow-mediated vasodilation, a measure of antioxidant status as assessed by determining antibody levels to epitopes of oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and questionnaires addressing walking impairment and quality of life. ■ RESULTS: Maximal treadmill walking time increased by 20 ± 80 and 91 ± 242 seconds in the placebo and the EGb 761 groups, respectively (P = .12). Pain-free walking time increased by 15 ± 31 and 21 ± 43 seconds, respectively (P = .28). No significant differences were detected between groups for any of the secondary outcomes. ■ CONCLUSIONS: In older adults with PAD, Ginkgo biloba produced a modest but insignificant increase in maximal treadmill walking time and flow-mediated vasodilation. These data do not support the use of Ginkgo biloba as an effective therapy for PAD, although a longer duration of use should be considered in any future trials.

AB - ■ PURPOSE: Medical therapies for treatment of peripheral artery disease (PAD) are limited. Ginkgo biloba has been reported to increase maximal and pain-free walking distance among patients with PAD; however, the evidence is inconsistent. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of 300 mg/d of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) versus placebo on treadmill walking time and related cardiovascular measures among patients with PAD. ■ METHODS: A double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial with a 4-month duration was used. Participants were 62 adults, aged 70 ± 8 years (mean ± SD), with claudication symptoms of PAD. The primary study outcomes were maximal and pain-free walking time on a treadmill. Secondary outcomes included flow-mediated vasodilation, a measure of antioxidant status as assessed by determining antibody levels to epitopes of oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and questionnaires addressing walking impairment and quality of life. ■ RESULTS: Maximal treadmill walking time increased by 20 ± 80 and 91 ± 242 seconds in the placebo and the EGb 761 groups, respectively (P = .12). Pain-free walking time increased by 15 ± 31 and 21 ± 43 seconds, respectively (P = .28). No significant differences were detected between groups for any of the secondary outcomes. ■ CONCLUSIONS: In older adults with PAD, Ginkgo biloba produced a modest but insignificant increase in maximal treadmill walking time and flow-mediated vasodilation. These data do not support the use of Ginkgo biloba as an effective therapy for PAD, although a longer duration of use should be considered in any future trials.

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