Effect of increased tea consumption on oxidative DNA damage among smokers: A randomized controlled study

Iman A Hakim, Robin B Harris, Sylvia Brown, Hsiao-Hui Chow, Sheila Wiseman, Sanjiv Agarwal, Wendy Talbot

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

146 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tea drinking has been associated with decreased occurrence of cancer and heart disease. One potential mechanism for these findings is the strong antioxidant effect of tea polyphenols. A phase II randomized controlled tea intervention trial was designed to study the effect of high consumption (4 cups/d) of decaffeinated green or black tea on oxidative DNA damage as measured by urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) among smokers over a 4-mo period. A total of 143 heavy smokers, aged 18-79 y, were randomized to drink either green or black tea or water. Levels of plasma and urinary catechins and urinary 8-OHdG were measured monthly. A total of 133 of 143 smokers completed the 4-mo intervention. Multiple linear regression models were used to estimate the main effects and interaction effect of green and black tea consumption on creatinine-adjusted urinary 8-OHdG, with or without adjustment for potential confounders. Plasma and urinary levels of catechins rose significantly in the green tea group compared with the other two groups. Assessment of urinary 8-OHdG after adjustment for baseline measurements and other potential confounders revealed a highly significant decrease in urinary 8-OHdG (-31%) after 4 mo of drinking decaffeinated green tea (P = 0.002). No change in urinary 8-OHdG was seen among smokers assigned to the black tea group. These data suggest that regular green tea drinking might protect smokers from oxidative damages and could reduce cancer risk or other diseases caused by free radicals associated with smoking.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume133
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1 2003

Fingerprint

tea (beverage)
green tea
Tea
DNA damage
DNA Damage
black tea
drinking
flavanols
Drinking
neoplasms
smoking (food products)
heart diseases
Catechin
creatinine
polyphenols
Rosa
Linear Models
antioxidants
Polyphenols

Keywords

  • 8-OHdG
  • DNA damage
  • Smokers
  • Tea
  • Trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Effect of increased tea consumption on oxidative DNA damage among smokers : A randomized controlled study. / Hakim, Iman A; Harris, Robin B; Brown, Sylvia; Chow, Hsiao-Hui; Wiseman, Sheila; Agarwal, Sanjiv; Talbot, Wendy.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 133, No. 10, 01.10.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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