Effect of noise correlation on detectability of disk signals in medical imaging.

K. J. Myers, Harrison H Barrett, M. C. Borgstrom, D. D. Patton, G. W. Seeley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

165 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pixel signal-to-noise ratio is one accepted measure of image quality for predicting observer performance in medical imaging. We have found, however, that images with equal pixel signal-to-noise ratio (SNRp) but different correlation properties give quite different observer-performance measures for a simple detection experiment. The SNR at the output of an ideal detector with the ability to prewhiten the noise is also a poor predictor of human performance for disk signals in high-pass noise. We have found constant observer efficiencies for humans relative to the performance of a nonprewhitening detector for this task.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1752-1759
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics and image science
Volume2
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1985

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Medical imaging
Signal-To-Noise Ratio
Diagnostic Imaging
Noise
Signal to noise ratio
Pixels
Detectors
Image quality
Experiments

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of noise correlation on detectability of disk signals in medical imaging. / Myers, K. J.; Barrett, Harrison H; Borgstrom, M. C.; Patton, D. D.; Seeley, G. W.

In: Journal of the Optical Society of America. A, Optics and image science, Vol. 2, No. 10, 10.1985, p. 1752-1759.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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