Effect of oxygen supply on the size of implantable islet-containing encapsulation devices

Klearchos K Papas, Efstathios S. Avgoustiniatos, Thomas M. Suszynski

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Beta-cell replacement therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of diabetes but is currently limited by the human islet availability and by the need for systemic immunosuppression. Tissue engineering approaches that will enable the utilization of islets or beta;-cells from alternative sources (such as porcine islets or human stem cell derived beta cells) and minimize or eliminate the need for immunosuppression have the potential to address these critical limitations. However, tissue engineering approaches are critically hindered by the device size (similar to the size of a large lat screen television) required for eficacy in humans. The primary factor dictating the device size is the oxygen availability to islets to support their viability and function (glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSiS]). GSiS is affected (inhibited) at a much higher oxygen partial pressure [pO2] than that of viability (e.g. 10 mmHg as opposed to 0.1 mmHg). enhanced oxygen supply (higher pO2) than what is available in vivo at transplant sites can have a profound effect on the required device size (potentially reduce it to the size of a postage stamp). This paper summarizes key information on the effect of oxygen on islet viability and function within immunoisolation devices and describes the potential impact of enhanced oxygen supply to devices in vivo on device size reduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-77
Number of pages6
JournalPanminerva Medica
Volume58
Issue number1
StatePublished - Mar 1 2016

Fingerprint

Oxygen
Equipment and Supplies
Tissue Engineering
Immunosuppression
Philately
Insulin
Glucose
Partial Pressure
Television
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Swine
Stem Cells
Transplants
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus, type 1
  • Equipment and supplies
  • Oxygen

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effect of oxygen supply on the size of implantable islet-containing encapsulation devices. / Papas, Klearchos K; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S.; Suszynski, Thomas M.

In: Panminerva Medica, Vol. 58, No. 1, 01.03.2016, p. 72-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Papas, Klearchos K ; Avgoustiniatos, Efstathios S. ; Suszynski, Thomas M. / Effect of oxygen supply on the size of implantable islet-containing encapsulation devices. In: Panminerva Medica. 2016 ; Vol. 58, No. 1. pp. 72-77.
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